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Posts tagged Don River

Rivers and Reservoirs in Russia – July 22nd, 2009

47.8N 42.8E

July 22nd, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Russia - June 21st, 2009

Russia - June 21st, 2009

Multiple rivers and streams criss-cross this portion of Russian terrain between the Sea of Azov and the Caspian Sea. The  Volga River and surrounded vegetation are seen as the thick green line stretching from the center to the central right edge.

Forming a right angle with the Volga is a large artificial lake, the Volgograd Reservoir, formed by the dam of the Volga Hydroelectric Station.  The third largest reservoir in Russia, it has an area of 3,117 sq. km, a volume of 31,5 sq.km, a length of 540 km, a maximal width of 17 km, and an average depth of 10,1 m.

Another artificial lake can be observed to the southwest: the Tsimlyansk Reservoir or Tsimlyanskoye Reservoir, on the Don River.  One of the largest reservoirs in Russia, it providing power and irrigation to the Rostov and Volgograd regions. The Tsimlyansk Dam also provides flood control for the lower Don River basin.

Along with the Volga-Don Canal, the reservoir forms part of a waterway for the shipping of raw materials from the upper Don and Volga-Caspian basins to the lower Don River – Sea of Azov basin and vice versa.

Many fields are visible in this region, particularly around the Tsimlyansk Reservoir. Crops grown around the lake include wheat, rice, cotton, maize, alfalfa, fruit, grapes, and vegetables.

Don River Spilling Sediments into Sea of Azov

47.0N 39.4E

July 12th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Russia - June 21st, 2009

Russia - June 21st, 2009

The Sea of Azov is the shallowest sea in the world with an average depth of 13 metres (43 ft) and maximum depth of 15.3 metres (50 ft).

In places where silt has built up, such as Taganrog Bay (above, center), the average depth is less than 1 metre (3 ft). Here, sediments from the Don River (top right quadrant) can be seen spilling into the bay, coloring its waters green, and gradually swirling downwards into the rest of the sea.

The prevailing current in the sea is a counter-clockwise swirl. Salinity varies from 1 to 15 parts per thousand (compared to 30 to 40 for the oceans) across the sea and with season.

The Strait of Kerch links the Sea of Azov to the Black Sea (below).

Russia’s Taganrog Bay in the Sea of Azov – May 25th, 2009

47.0N 38.6E

May 25th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Taganrog Bay, Russia - May 17th, 2009

Taganrog Bay, Russia - May 17th, 2009

Taganrog Bay or Taganrog Gulf  is the northeastern arm of the Sea of Azov. At its northeast end is the mouth of the Don River. The bay is about 140 km long and 31 km wide at its mouth, with a median depth of about 5 m.

Its mouth is marked by the Dolgaya Spit to the south and the Belosaray Spit (Belosarayskaya Spit) to the north. It abounds in sandy spits that partly enclose shallow bays. The bay also contains the Sandy Isles.

It is generally frozen from December to May, although here it has already thawed completely. It is fed by the Don, Kalmius, Mius and Yeya Rivers.

Here, the waters of the bay appear greenish in color due to an algal bloom. Much of the Sea of Azov is characterized by intensive and rather long-term blooming periods. The tolerance of algae to salinity changes precisely defines the boundaries of their distribution in the sea and the Bay of Taganrog.

Agriculture around Tsimlyansk Reservoir, Russia

May 22nd, 2009 Category: Lakes

Tsimlyansk Reservoir, Russia - May 17th, 2009

Tsimlyansk Reservoir, Russia - May 17th, 2009

The Tsimlyansk Reservoir is located on the Don River on the territories of Rostov and Volgograd Oblasts at. It is one of the largest reservoirs in Russia.

It was completed in 1952 to provide power and irrigation to the region from Rostov to Volgograd. The Tsimlyansk Dam also provides flood control for the lower Don River basin.

The reservoir is part of a waterway for the shipping of raw materials from the upper Don and Volga basins to the lower Don River basin and vice versa.

Completion of the lake resulted in a high growth of industry and agriculture. In fact, many fields can be seen here in the area surrounding the lake. Crops grown in the region around the lake include wheat, rice, cotton, maize, alfalfa, fruit, grapes, and vegetables.

The Sea of Azov and the Crimean Peninsula – April 13th, 2009

April 13th, 2009 Category: Image of the day

Sea of Azov and Crimea - April 5th, 2009

Sea of Azov and Crimea - April 5th, 2009

The Sea of Azov is the world’s shallowest sea, linked by the Strait of Kerch to the Black Sea to the south. It is bounded on the north by Ukraine, on the east by Russia and on the west by the Crimean peninsula.

The sea is 340 kilometres (210 mi) long and 135 kilometres (84 mi) wide and has an area of 37,555 square kilometres (14,500 sq mi).

The main rivers flowing into it are the Don and Kuban; they ensure that the waters of the sea have comparatively low salinity and are almost fresh in places, and also bring in huge volumes of silt. Here, such silt appears greenish yellow and is particularly intense along the northern shores.

To the west also lie the 110 kilometres (68 mi) long Arabat Spit and the highly saline marshy inlets of the Sivash Sea on the border of the Crimean Peninsula.

The Sea of Azov is the shallowest sea in the world with an average depth of 13 metres (43 ft) and maximum depth of 15.3 metres (50 ft); where silt has built up, such as the Gulf of Taganrog, the average depth is less than 1 metre (3 ft).