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Snow in the Northeast and Pamlico Sound in North Carolina, USA

35.3N 75.8W

January 30th, 2011 Category: Lakes

USA - January 15th, 2011

This image focuses on the East Coast of the United States of America. Some snow can be seen to the northeast, in the states of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware.

States to the south, including Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina, are snow free. In North Carolina, the Pamlico Sound can be observed by the coast. It is the largest lagoon along the East Coast of the USA, 129 km (80 miles) long and 24 to 48 km (15 to 30 miles) wide.

East Coast of USA Hit by Another Snow Storm – February 8th, 2010

38.8N 77W

February 8th, 2010 Category: Image of the day

USA - January 2nd, 2010

USA - January 2nd, 2010

A massive snow storm fell on the East Coast Friday and Saturday, and some areas have had record snow accumulation totals over the past two days. The East Coast snow storm shut down airports, highways, and transit systems, and left tens of thousands of people without electricity.

Here, snow can be seen covering parts of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware and Virginia. Offshore is another white phenomenon: the clouds are arranged in parallel lines known as cloud streets.

This snowfall broke many longstanding records. Saturday, a record snowfall total of 16 inches was reported at Washington Dulles airport, which broke an old record of 10.6, set December 12, 1964. Reagan National airport also reported a record breaking snow fall of 13.3 inches Saturday, surpassing the old record of 11.5 inches set on December 17, 1932.

The Philadelphia airport received 22.9 inches in snowfall totals since Friday, and Colora, Maryland received 17.2 inches of snow fall.

The state of New Jersey reported snow fall in the following areas: New Brunswick 11.1 inches, Pottersville 7.8 inches, Cape May 6.2 inches, and Midland Park 5.7 inches. The state of Delaware reported snow fall totals in the following areas (in inches): Blackbird 17.7, New Castle airport 17, Dover 16.2, and in Wilmington 14.

The state of Virginia received more than 20 inches of snow in certain areas of the state and a state of emergency was called on Friday. The state has reported more than 3,000 car accidents and disabled cars since Friday night. A total of five people have died due to the snow storm, three of which were in Virginia.

Massive Blizzard Dumps Snow Over Eastern USA

38.8N 77W

December 22nd, 2009 Category: Snapshots

USA - December 20th, 2009

USA - December 20th, 2009

A massive winter storm that dumped record amounts of snow in the east of the US is now slowly making its way toward the north-east, still shutting airports and closing roads. In Washington DC and New York airports have reopened and roads are being cleared, but authorities report it will be days before things return to normal.

The storm, which began with severe flooding and a tornado in Florida, has covered Washington DC, Philadelphia and New York with a blanket of snow smashing a 70-year-old records. The 33 centimetres of snow that fell in Washington, D.C., by late afternoon was the most ever recorded for a day in December.

The blizzard rocked the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast United States on Saturday, crippling travel across the region and causing hundreds of thousands of power outages. Five deaths appeared to have been caused by the storm system, which stretched from the Carolinas north to New England and spread into some Midwestern states.

Here, snow can be seen covering parts of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Washington D.C., Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky.

Forecasters said the storm system was expected to generate winds up to 55 km/h, which could cause near-whiteout conditions. Authorities in many areas asked drivers to stay off the roads if possible. The storm system, coming from the Gulf of Mexico and spreading out across much of the Atlantic coastline, was forecast to bring a mix of snow and freezing rain to North Carolina, Tennessee and parts of western and central Virginia.

Bodies of Water Along the East Coast of the USA, from New Jersey to South Carolina

35.3N 75.8W

October 27th, 2009 Category: Rivers

USA - September 29th, 2009

USA - September 29th, 2009

Sediments spill from several rivers along the east coast of the United States, from southern New Jersey (top) down to South Carolina (bottom). These are particularly concentrated around the Charleston Harbor in South Carolina (bottom edge), fed by the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, by the mouths of the Cape Fear and the New Rivers in North Carolina,  and in Pamlico Sound, North Carolina (center).

Just north of the greenish Pamlico Sound is Albemarle Sound, lined with dark brown sediments. The sound is actually a large estuary on the coast of North Carolina located at the confluence of a group of rivers, including the Chowan and the Roanoke.

To the north of the Albermarle Sound, the Chesapeake Bay appears relatively free of sediments. The Potomac River flows into this bay on the shores of the state of Maryland.

Finally, continuing northward, the shores of the Delaware Bay, a major estuary outlet of the Delaware River separating the states of Delaware and New Jersey, are lined with brown sediments.

Shoreline of Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic USA – September 16th, 2009

40.7N 73.9W

September 16th, 2009 Category: Image of the day

Northeastern USA - August 16th, 2009

Northeastern USA - August 16th, 2009

The coastline of the northeastern and mid-atlantic United States of America appears mostly clear to the north, around Massachusetts, with more sediments present to the south in the Delaware Bay.

Of note along the coastline is Cape Cod, a hook-shaped peninsula belonging to Massachusetts. South of this land formation are the islands of Martha’s Vineyard (left) and Nantucket (right).

Moving down the coast, Long Island can be seen, with the city of New York on its western extremity appearing as a tan area. Inland, above the island, is the state of Connecticut, with the state of New Jersey to the east and the state of New York to the northeast.

Further south, the Delaware Bay, separating the states of New Jersey and Delaware displays some brown sediments. Another bay, the Cheasapeake, in Maryland and Virginia, is also visible in the bottom left corner.