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Posts tagged Dakar

Dust by Senegal River and Cap-Vert Peninsula, Senegal

May 26th, 2013 Category: Dust Storms, Rivers

West Africa – May 25th, 2013

Dust from the Sahara Desert blows westward off the coast of West Africa. The dust is thickest around the border between Mauritania (above) and Senegal (below), with plumes visible just north of the Senegal River (center) and the Cap-Vert peninsula, a rocky promontory extending west from the main sandy areas of Senegal on which the capital city of Dakar is located.

Dust Over Atlantic Ocean West of Senegal

14.6N 17.4W

December 11th, 2012 Category: Dust Storms

Senegal – December 6th, 2012

Dust blows off the west coast of Africa, west of Mauritania, Senegal, the Gambia and Guinea-Bissau (top to bottom). Protruding outwards from the coast is the Cap-Vert Peninsula, on which the Senegalese capital city of Dakar is located. In the full image, the dust can be seen reaching across the Atlantic Ocean to the Cape Verde Islands.

Cap Vert Between Senegal and Gambia Rivers, Senegal

14.7N 17.3W

February 23rd, 2012 Category: Rivers

Gambia and Senegal - January 31st, 2012

Visible at the top of this wide-swath ASAR image is the Sénégal River, a 1,790 km (1,110 mi) long river in West Africa that forms the border between Senegal and Mauritania. The Sénégal’s headwaters are the Semefé (Bakoye) and Bafing rivers which both originate in Guinea. Later in its course, the Senegal River flows through semi-arid land in the north of Senegal, forming the border with Mauritania, and into the Atlantic. It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a thin strip of sand called the Langue de Barbarie before it pours into the ocean itself.

Visible near the bottom edge is the Gambia River, which runs 1,130 kilometres (700 mi) from the Fouta Djallon plateau in north Guinea westward through Senegal and The Gambia to the Atlantic Ocean at the city of Banjul. About 100 km from its mouth it gradually widens to over 10 km wide where it meets the sea.

Protruding off the coast between the two rivers is Cap-Vert, a peninsula in Senegal, and the westernmost point of the continent of Africa and of the Old World mainland. Cap-Vert is a rocky promontory extending west from the main sandy areas of Senegal. Dakar, the capital of Senegal, is located near the southern tip. Twin volcanic cones, the Deux Mamelles (“Two Teats”), dominate the landscape along the coast northwest of Dakar.

From the Senegal to the Geba: Rivers Along Coast of West Africa

14.6N 17.4W

June 6th, 2009 Category: Rivers

Senegal and Guinea Bissau - June 2nd, 2009

Senegal and Guinea Bissau - June 2nd, 2009

Sediments flow into the Atlantic Ocean from rivermouths along the coast of West Africa. The rivers discharging the most sediments are the Cacheu and the Geba Rivers in Guinea-Bissau (bottom).

The waters of the Geba appear golden brown, in turn giving those around the Bissagos Islands a golden green tinge.

Moving northwards, the Casamance River becomes visible near the border between Senegal and Guinea-Bissau. Continuing north into the Gambia, surrounded by Senegal on three sides, the Gambia River can also be seen.

The sediments being discharged by these two rivers are greenish in color, as opposed to the golden ones of the Geba.

Finally, moving north of Dakar on the Cape Verde Peninsula, the Senegal River can be found on the border between Mauritania (above) and Senegal.

Coastline of Senegal, the Gambia and Guinea-Bissau

November 28th, 2008 Category: Rivers

Coastline of Senegal, the Gambia and Guinea-Bissau - November 26th, 2008

Coastline of Senegal, the Gambia and Guinea-Bissau - November 26th, 2008

This full resolution image give us a fine view of the West African coast, from Dakar, Senegal (top left) to Cacine, Guinea-Bissau (bottom right), passing through The Gambia in the center. Moving southward, the terrain changes from arid desert to forest.

It also allows us to see many rivers flowing out into the Atlantic Ocean. The river located at the point where the terrain changes from tan to green is the Gambia River, 1,130 km (700 mi) long, reaching the Atlantic Ocean near the city of Banjul.

Further south, in Senegal, is the Casamance River, 320km (200mi) in length. Moving down into Guinea-Bissau, we have the Cacheu River (Farim River), 257 km long.

Continuing south through Guinea Bissau, the most visible river is the Geba, appearing tan due to sediments. As it flows past the capital city of Bissau and through the Bissagos Archipelago, we can see the sediments filter out into the Atlantic Ocean.

The Bissagos Archipelago, also known as the Bissagos Islands or the Arquipélago dos Bijagós, is a group of 18 major islands and dozens of smaller ones that constitute a UNESCO biosphere reserve.

South of the Geba River is the Corubal River, one of the Geba’s tributaries.

source Wikipedia

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