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Posts tagged Coromandel Peninsula

Great Barrier Island, New Zealand

36.2S 175.4E

December 23rd, 2011 Category: Mountains

New Zealand - December 22nd, 2011

This orthorectified image shows the Great Barrier Island, a large island of New Zealand, situated 100 km to the north-east of central Auckland in the outer Hauraki Gulf. With an area of 285 km2 it is the fourth-largest island of New Zealand’s main chain of islands, with its highest point, Mount Hobson, rising 621 m.

South of the island is the Colville Channel, one of three channels connecting the Hauraki Gulf with the Pacific Ocean to the northeast of Auckland, New Zealand. It lies between the southern end of Great Barrier Island and Cape Colville at the northern tip of the Coromandel Peninsula. The tiny Channel Island lies in the centre of the channel.

The Coromandel Peninsula (visible in the lower part of the full image) lies in the North Island of New Zealand. It is part of the Waikato Region and Thames-Coromandel District and extends 85 kilometres north from the western end of the Bay of Plenty, forming a natural barrier to protect the Hauraki Gulf and the Firth of Thames in the west from the Pacific Ocean to the east. At its broadest point, it is 40 kilometres wide.

Mountains of the Great Barrier Island and Coromandel Peninsula, New Zealand

36.1S 175.4E

March 28th, 2011 Category: Mountains

New Zealand - March 27th, 2011

This orthorectified image shows the mountains of the Great Barrier Island (above) and the Coromandel Peninsula (below), of New Zealand’s North Island.

The former is situated in the outer Hauraki Gulf. With an area of 285 km2 it is the fourth-largest island of New Zealand’s main chain of islands, with its highest point, Mount Hobson, rising 621 m.

The Coromandel Peninsula extends 85 kilometres north from the western end of the Bay of Plenty, forming a natural barrier to protect the Hauraki Gulf and the Firth of Thames in the west from the Pacific Ocean to the east. At its broadest point, it is 40 kilometres wide.

The northernmost mountains on the peninsula are part of the Moehau Range, extending from the settlement of Colville northwards to the tip of the peninsula. Mt Moehau is the highest point of the range, at 892m above sea level.

Mountains of New Zealand’s Coromandel Peninsula

37S 175.6E

August 28th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

New Zealand - August 16th, 2009

New Zealand - August 16th, 2009

The Coromandel Peninsula lies in the North Island of New Zealand. It is part of the Waikato region and extends 85 kilometres north from the western end of the Bay of Plenty, forming a natural barrier to protect the Hauraki Gulf and the Firth of Thames in the west from the Pacific Ocean to the east.

At its broadest point, the peninsula is 40 kilometres wide. It is steep and hilly, as the Coromandel Range forms a spine for the peninsula rising to nearly 900 metres. The contours of these mountains can be seen clearly in this orthorectified image.

By contrast, a flat area can be seen at the foot of the peninsula. This area is known as the Hauraki Plains, occupying the southern portion of a rift valley.

Firth of Thames, New Zealand

37.1S 175.4E

July 21st, 2009 Category: Rivers

New Zealand - July 12th, 2009

New Zealand - July 12th, 2009

The Firth of Thames, visible in its entirety upon opening the full version of this orthorectified image, is a large bay located in the north of the North Island of New Zealand.

The firth lies at the southern end of the Hauraki Gulf, southeast of the city of Auckland. It occupies a rift valley or graben between the hilly Coromandel Peninsula (right) and Hunua Ranges which continue into the Hauraki Plains to the south. The large, dark patch below the firth is an area of native forest.

It is the firth of the rivers Waihou and Piako, the former of which was formerly named the Thames River. The Waihou River can be seen running parallel to the mountains on the right and empyting into the bay.