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Posts tagged Colorado River

Mexicali Between Salton Sea and Gulf of California

32.6N 115.4W

June 9th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Lakes, Rivers

USA and Mexico - May 23rd, 2011

The large lake in the upper left quadrant, in California but not far from the Mexico border, is known as the Salton Sea. A large agricultural area extends southward from the lake to the Sea of Cortez (Gulf of California).

In the middle of this agricultural area, about halfway between the sea and the gulf is the city of Mexicali. It is the capital of the Mexican state of Baja California, situated on the U.S.-Mexico border adjacent to Calexico, California.

Moving southward to the gulf, the Colorado River can be seen spilling tan sediments into the northern end. To the east, the shores of the gulf are flanked by the sandy Desierto de Altar.

Agriculture by Salton Sea and in Mexicali Valley, USA and Mexico – May 11th, 2011

32.6N 115.4W

May 11th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers, Sediments

Mexico - May 1st, 2011

The Salton Sea, a large lake near the California-Mexico border, can be observed in the upper left quadrant of this image.

South of the sea is a large agricultural area that stretches towards the Sea of Cortez (Gulf of California). This green, field-covered area is interrupted by the grey of the city of Mexicali, the capital of the Mexican state of Baja California, situated on the U.S.-Mexico border adjacent to Calexico, California.

The Mexicali Valley is one of the largest and most fertile valleys in Mexico. The Valley has over fifty different crops and is similar to the Imperial Valley in its agricultural production. The Mexicali Valley is a primary source of water for the region, having the largest irrigation district in Mexico.

Continuing southeastward past the agricultural zones, one comes to the sandy Desierto de Altar and then to the Sea of Cortez. Sediments from the Colorado River spill into the northern end of the sea.

Agriculture Between Salton Sea and Sea of Cortez, USA and Mexico – February 15th, 2011

33.2N 115.7W

February 15th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

USA - January 17th, 2011

The large, dark blue lake in the upper left quadrant is the Salton Sea, a saline, endorheic rift lake in California, near the border with Mexico.

An extensive area of agriculture can be seen between the lake and the Sea of Cortez (or Gulf of California, bottom right), despite the arid presence of the Gran Desierto de Altar, part of the Sonoran Desert, to the east.

The green color of the northern part of the Sea of Cortez is caused by the influx of sediments from the Colorado River. The river is approximately 1450 mi long, and drains a part of the arid regions on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains.

Agriculture Between Salton Sea and Gran Desierto de Altar, USA and Mexico – July 27th, 2010

31.8N 113.6W

July 27th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers, Volcanoes

Mexico - June 23rd, 2010

Mexico - June 23rd, 2010

Greenish sediments flow forth from the Colorado River, around Montague Island, and into the Sea of Cortes, left of the image center. Upon opening the full image, more of the sea and the Baja California peninsula in Mexico can be observed.

Near the north shores of the sea is the Gran Desierto de Altar, part of the Sonoran Desert. The dark brown circular area amidst the tan dunes is the Pinacate Peaks (Sierra Pinacate), a volcanic group of volcanic peaks and cinder cones.

Following the river northwards, one comes to an irrigated area in this arid region – the Imperial Valley in southern California. Continuing northwards through the agricultural zone, one finds the Salton Sea, a saline lake. The largest such lake in California, it covers a surface area of approximately 376 sq mi (970 km2).

Lake Powell and Grand Canyon, USA – July 18th, 2010

37.4N 110.5W

July 18th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

USA - June 20th, 2010

USA - June 20th, 2010

Lake Powell is a reservoir on the Colorado River, straddling the border between Utah and Arizona. It can be seen at the center of this image as a dark blue area surrounded by rose colored terrain.

It is the second largest man-made reservoir in the United States behind Lake Mead, storing 24,322,000 acre feet (30 kmĀ³) of water when full. Lake Powell was created by the flooding of Glen Canyon by the controversial Glen Canyon Dam.

Upon opening the full image, another canyon can be seen in the lower left quadrant, extending westward from the western extreme of Lake Powell. This is the Grand Canyon, with the Colorado River flowing through the center.