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Posts tagged Colorado River

Grand Canyon Between Lakes Mead and Powell, USA – February 17th, 2012

36.0N 112.1W

February 17th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

USA - January 2nd, 2012

Visible by the left edge of this image is Lake Mead, with a distinctive, 3-pronged shape. Lake Mead is the largest reservoir in the United States in maximum water capacity. It is located on the Colorado River about 30 mi (48 km) southeast of Las Vegas, Nevada, in the states of Nevada and Arizona. Formed by water impounded by the Hoover Dam, it extends 112 miles (180 km) behind the dam, holding approximately 28,500,000 acre feet (35.2 km3) of water

Visible further east is another large reservoir, Lake Powell. It is also located on the Colorado River, straddling the border between Utah and Arizona. It is the second largest man-made reservoir in the United States behind Lake Mead, storing 24,322,000 acre feet (3.0001×1010 m3) of water when full. The lake was created by the flooding of Glen Canyon by the controversial Glen Canyon Dam.

Located between the two reservoirs (best observed in full image) is the Grand Canyon, a steep-sided canyon carved by the Colorado River in the United States in the state of Arizona. The Grand Canyon is 277 miles (446 km) long, up to 18 miles (29 km) wide and attains a depth of over a mile (6,000 feet / 1,800 metres). Nearly two billion years of the Earth’s geological history have been exposed as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted.

Lake Powell in Glen Canyon, USA

37.4N 110.5W

November 29th, 2011 Category: Lakes, Rivers

USA - November 21st, 2011

Lake Powell is a huge reservoir on the Colorado River, straddling the border between Utah and Arizona. It is the second largest man-made reservoir in the United States behind Lake Mead, storing 24,322,000 acre feet (3.0001×1010 m3) of water when full.

Lake Powell was created by the flooding of Glen Canyon by the controversial Glen Canyon Dam. Glen Canyon was carved by differential erosion from the Colorado River over an estimated 5 million years. The Colorado Plateau, through which the canyon cuts, arose some 11 million years ago. Within that plateau lie layers of rock from over 300 million years ago to the relatively recent volcanic activity.

Colorado River Mouth and Gran Desierto de Altar, USA and Mexico – November 24th, 2011

31.9N 114.4W

November 24th, 2011 Category: Deserts, Image of the day, Rivers, Volcanoes

Mexico - November 23rd, 2011

The Colorado River is a river in the Southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, approximately 2,330 kilometers (1,450 mi) long. Here, it can be seen at its mouth, empyting tan sediments into the Gulf of California between the Baja California peninsula and mainland Mexico.

Visible extending across much of the northern border of the Gulf of California, is the Gran Desierto de Altar. One of the major portions of the Sonoran Desert of Mexico, including the only active erg dune region in North America, it reaches more than 100 kilometers east to west, and over 50 km north to south.

The dark brown area amidst the desert sands is the Pinacate Peaks (Sierra Pinacate), a group of volcanic peaks and cinder cones located mostly in the Mexican state of Sonora along the international border adjacent to the U.S. state of Arizona, surrounded by the vast sand dune field of the Gran Desierto de Altar, at the desert’s southeast.

Sediments in Northern Gulf of California, Mexico – November 2nd, 2011

29.0N 113W

November 2nd, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Mexico - October 30th, 2011

The Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés) is a body of water that separates the Baja California Peninsula from the Mexican mainland. It is bordered by the states of Baja California, Baja California Sur, Sonora, and Sinaloa with a coastline of approximately 2,500 mi (4,000 km).

Rivers which flow into the Gulf of California include the Colorado, Fuerte, Mayo, Sinaloa, Sonora, and the Yaqui. Here, sediments from the Colorado River can be seen flowing into the northern end of the gulf, giving it a tan color than turns to green as they diffuse.

Contours of the Grand Canyon in Arizona, USA

36.0N 112.1W

October 8th, 2011 Category: Rivers

USA - October 3rd, 2011

This orthorectified image shows part of the Grand Canyon, a steep-sided canyon carved by the Colorado River in Arizona, USA. The Grand Canyon is 277 miles (446 km) long, up to 18 miles (29 km) wide and attains a depth of over a mile (6,000 feet / 1,800 metres).

Nearly two billion years of the Earth’s geological history have been exposed as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted.

While the specific geologic processes and timing that formed the Grand Canyon are the subject of debate by geologists, recent evidence suggests the Colorado River established its course through the canyon at least 17 million years ago. Since that time, the Colorado River continued to erode and form the canyon to its present-day configuration.