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Posts tagged Chonos Archipelago

Chiloé Island Off Coast of Chile – January 2nd, 2012

43.1S 74W

January 2nd, 2012 Category: Mountains

Argentina and Chile - December 24th, 2011

Visible just above the center of this image of Chile (left) and Argentina (right) and the countries’ Andes Mountain border area is Chiloé Island, the largest island of the Chiloé Archipelago off the coast of Chile, in the Pacific Ocean. The island is located in southern Chile, in the Los Lagos Region.

Chiloé Island (8,394 km², 3241 sq mi), is the second largest island in Chile (and the fifth largest in South America), after the Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego. It is separated from the Chilean mainland by the Chacao Strait (“Canal Chacao”) to the north, and by the Gulf of Ancud (Golfo de Ancud) and the Gulf of Corcovado (Golfo Corcovado) to the east; the Pacific ocean lies to the west, and the Chonos Archipelago lies to the south, across the Boca del Guafo.

Chonos Archipelago and General Carrera Lake, Chile and Argentina – March 5th, 2011

45.1S 73.9W

March 5th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Argentina and Chile - February 10th, 2011

Most of the islands visible by the Chilean coast in this image are part of the Chonos Archipelago (Spanish: Archipiélago de los Chonos), a series of low, mountainous, elongated islands with deep bays, traces of a submerged Chilean Coast Range.

Of interest further inland is General Carrera Lake (also known as Buenos Aires Lake in Argentina), located in Patagonia on the Chile-Argentina border. The lake is of glacial origin and is surrounded by the Andes mountain range. It drains to the Pacific Ocean on the west through the Baker River.

Islands of the Chonos Archipelago, Chile

45.1S 73.9W

March 25th, 2010 Category: Snapshots

Chile - February 25th, 2010

Chile - February 25th, 2010

Chonos Archipelago (in Spanish: Archipiélago de los Chonos), south of Chiloé Island,  is a series of low, mountainous, elongated islands with deep bays that are traces of a drowned Chilean Coast Range.

Most of the islands are forested, with little or no human settlement. The deep Moraleda Channel separates the islands of the Chonos Archipelago from the mainland of Chile and from Magdalena Island.

All of the islands are part of the Aisén Region. The largest are Melchor Island, Benjamin Island, Traiguen Island, Riveros Island, Cuptana Island, James Island, Victoria Island, Simpson Island, Level Island, and Luz Island.

Chiloé Island in Southern Chile’s Los Lagos Region

42.4S 73.7W

March 9th, 2010 Category: Mountains

Chile - February 25th, 2010

Chile - February 25th, 2010

Chiloé Island (Spanish: Isla de Chiloé), also known as Greater Island of Chiloé (Isla Grande de Chiloé), is the largest island of the Chiloé Archipelago off the coast of Chile, in the Pacific Ocean. The island is located in southern Chile, in the Los Lagos Region, visible here in the lower left quadrant.

The effects of the recent Chilean earthquake were felt as far south as Chiloé Island. Argentina has sent construction teams there to help reconstruct some of the washed away coastal buildings.

Chiloé Island (8,394 km², 3241 sq mi), is the second largest island in Chile (and the fifth largest in South America), after the Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego. It is separated from the Chilean mainland by the Chacao Strait (“Canal Chacao”) to the north, and by the Gulf of Ancud (Golfo de Ancud) and the Gulf of Corcovado (Golfo Corcovado) to the east; the Pacific ocean lies to the west, and the Chonos Archipelago lies to the south, across the Boca del Guafo.

The island is 190 km (118 mi) from north to south, and averages 55–65 km wide (35 to 40 mi). The capital is Castro, on the east side of the island; the second largest town is Ancud, at the island’s northwest corner, and there are several smaller port towns on the east side of the island, such as Quellón, Dalcahue and Chonchi.

Chiloé Island and the Chonos Archipelago are a southern extension of the Chilean coastal range, which runs north and south, parallel to the Pacific coast and the Andes Mountains. The Chilean Central Valley lies between the coastal mountains and the Andes, of which the Gulfs of Ancud and Corcovado form the southern extension. Mountains run north and south along the spine of the island. The east coast is deeply indented, with several natural harbors and numerous smaller islands.

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