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Posts tagged Central Valley

Sacramento and the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California USA – September 5th, 2009

38.5N 121.4W

September 5th, 2009 Category: Image of the day

USA - July 16th, 2009

USA - July 16th, 2009

Sacramento is the capital of the state of California in the USA. The city is located along the Sacramento River and just south of the American River’s confluence in California’s expansive Central Valley.

To the east of the Central Valley is the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The change in elevation from 25 feet (8 meters) above mean sea level in the valley around Sacramento to around 6000 feet (about 1830 meters) at the right edge can be observed in this orthorectified image.

Wildfires in California – August 4th, 2009

40.7N 121.3W

August 4th, 2009 Category: Fires, Image of the day

Fires in California, USA - August 3rd, 2009

Fires in California, USA - August 3rd, 2009

Large fire, north

Large fire, north

Smaller fires, south

Smaller fires, south

Several fires can be seen burning in the forests of California, in the wooded and mountainous areas east of the Central Valley.

The smoke visible to the north is billowing from the Lassen National Forest, where lightning has caused a complex of multiple fires.

One large blaze, called Brown Fire, is reportedly 20% contained and is affecting 1,050 acres of land, while the other fires in the complex are 2% contained and are affecting around 1,000 Acres.

Other fires can also be noted further south, in or near Yosemite National Park. The smoke from all of the blazes is blowing towards the northwest.

Cities in California’s Central Valley, USA

37.9N 121.2W

August 2nd, 2009 Category: Lakes

USA - July 16th, 2009

USA - July 16th, 2009

The cities of Oakdale, Stockton, Manteca, Modesto and Turlock (from top to bottom) appear bright white and light grey, distinguishing themselves from the mostly dark grey of the rest of California’s Central Valley in this  orthorectified image.

To the east of Oakdale is the Camanche Reservoir, located in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. It is fed by the Mokelumne River, which originates in the higher altitudes of the mountain range.

Part of the Sierra Nevada range itself becomes visible at the far right after moving past the foothills. On the far left, in the lower corner, a small section of the Diablo Range (part of the Coast Ranges) can also be noted.

California Central Valley and Coastal Ranges

37.9N 121.2W

July 2nd, 2009 Category: Rivers, Snapshots

California, USA - June 30th, 2009

California, USA - June 30th, 2009

This orthorectified ASAR (radar) image shows two geographical divisions of California, USA: the South Coast Ranges and the Central Valley.

The South Coast Ranges run north and south, parallel to the Pacific Coast, between San Francisco Bay to the north, the California Central Valley to the east, the Transverse Ranges to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the west.

Much of the Central Valley is used for agriculture, although many populated areas are also visible. The bright white patch in the center, surrounded by farmland, is the city of Stockton. In and around Stockton are thousands of miles of waterways and rivers that make up the California Delta.

One important body of water visible here, at the upper left, is Suisun Bay, a shallow tidal estuary. It lies at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, thus forming the entrance to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, an inverted river delta.

The Southern Tip of California’s Central Valley

May 7th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

California, USA - May 6th, 2009

California, USA - May 6th, 2009

The Central Valley is a large, flat valley that dominates the central portion of the U.S. state of California. It is home to many of California’s most productive agricultural efforts, many of whose fields create green and brown checks in the image.

The valley stretches approximately 400 miles (600 km) from north to south. The southern half  is known as the San Joaquin Valley; this image focuses on the southernmost end.

The flatness of the valley floor contrasts with the rugged hills or gentle mountains that are typical of most of California’s terrain.

It is bounded by several mountain ranges, including the Sierra Nevada to the east, the Tehachapi Mountains to the south, and the Coastal Ranges to the west.