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Posts tagged Central African Republic

Mbomou and Uele Rivers Converging to Form Ubangi River, CAR and DRC

3.8N 23.0E

November 7th, 2011 Category: Rivers

DRC and CAR - November 4th, 2011

This wide-swath ASAR image shows the confluence of the Mbomou, Bili and Uele Rivers (from top to bottom on the right side of the image) to form the Ubangi River (upper left), by the border of the Central African Republic (CAR) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

The Ubangi River is the largest right-bank tributary of the Congo River of Central Africa. It begins at the confluence of the Mbomou and Uele Rivers and flows west, then bends to the southwest and passes through Bangui, after which it flows south to the Congo at Liranga.

The Ubangi’s length is about 1,060 kilometres (660 mi). Its total length with the Uele, its longest tributary, is 2,270 kilometres (1,410 mi). The Ubangi’s drainage basin is about 772,800 square kilometres (298,400 sq mi) and includes portions of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Central African Republic, and Republic of Congo.

Vegetation Index of Africa from Namibia to Central African Republic

March 10th, 2011 Category: Vegetation Index

Namibia - February 17th, 2011

The full version of this FAPAR image stretches from (bottom to top) northern Namibia, across Angola, to the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, to the Central African Republic.

The index is lowest in the Namib Desert, in Namibia (bottom left of full image) and in the Central African Republic (top section of full image). Most of the land inbetween shows a good index (green), with several large areas of high photosynthetic activity (rusty red).

Vegetation Index Around the Chari River, in Chad and the Central African Republic

9.1N 18.3E

December 17th, 2009 Category: Climate Change

Chad and Central African Republic - November 19th, 2009

Chad and Central African Republic - November 19th, 2009

The Chari or Shari River, a 949-kilometer-long river of central Africa, flows from the Central African Republic (below) through Chad (above) in this FAPAR image. The watershed of the river covers 548,747 kmĀ².

FAPAR is an abbreviation for Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation, which provides information on the planet’s vegetation index. In such images, the color spectrum over land runs from red (1.0), to green, to yellow and white (0.0), while bodies of water appear blue.

This image shows that the land around the river and to its south, in the Central African Republic, is more photosynthetically active (green) than the land in Chad, which appears yellow to white as one moves northward towards the arid belt of the Sahel.

Dust from Sudanese Storm Reaches Africa’s Atlantic Coast

1.4N 10.5E

May 15th, 2009 Category: Dust Storms

Cameroon, Gabon and the Congo - May 13th, 2009

Cameroon, Gabon and the Congo - May 13th, 2009

The dust storm originating in Sudan that has been blowing dust into many countries in Africa finally appears to be dissipating.

Initially, dust was blown northeast through Ethiopia and Eritrea, towards the Red Sea. Winds then changed direction and began sending dust into Chad, the Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (click here for previous articles).

Here, dust blows from those countries into Cameroon, the Congo and Gabon, along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean.

Sudanese Dust Storm Blows Southwest into Democratic Republic of the Congo

4.5N 25.1E

May 14th, 2009 Category: Dust Storms

Sudan and the Dem. Rep. of the Congo - May 13th, 2009

Sudan and the Dem. Rep. of the Congo - May 13th, 2009

Dust around Congo River

Dust around Congo River

Over the last week, a dust storm originating in Sudan has been sending sand and dust particles throughout Africa.

First, winds carried the dust northeast through Ethiopia and Eritrea, towards the Red Sea. Then, westerly air currentsĀ  began blowing a cloud of dust into Chad and the Central African Republic (click here for previous articles).

More recently, these winds have taken on a southwesterly direction, now carrying the dust through the Central African Republic and into the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Upon opening the full image, the dust can be seen reaching from the Nile River in Sudan (top) to the northern and central regions of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The close-up shows dust swirling in the air above the Congo River.

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