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Posts tagged Cauvery River

Sediments from Cauvery River by Point Calimere, India – June 30th, 2011

10.3N 79.8E

June 30th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Sediments

India and Sri Lanka - June 21st, 2011

Sediments can be observed in the Palk Strait, between India (left) and Sri Lanka (lower right). Here, they are most concentrated near Point Calimere, also called Cape Calimere, a low headland on the Coromandel Coast, in the Nagapattinam district of the state of Tamil Nadu, India.

It is the apex of the Cauvery River delta, and marks a nearly right-angle turn in the coastline. The Point Calimere Wildlife Sanctuary, with an area of 24.17 km²,  includes the cape and its three natural habitat types: dry evergreen forests, mangrove forests, and wetlands.

Stanley, Krisha Raja Sagara and Kabini Reservoirs in Southern India

11.9N 77.7E

April 15th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers

India - March 5th, 2010

India - March 5th, 2010

Several artificial reservoirs are visible near the Biligirirangan Hills (brown and green U-shaped area near image center), in southern India. These are the Stanley Reservoir, east of the hills and identifiable by its sideways V-shape, the Krishna Raja Sagara Lake, northwest of the hills, and the Kabini Reservoir, west of the hills.

The source of water for the Stanley Resersvoir is the River Kaveri (Cauvery), and the water is retained by the Mettur Dam, Tamil Nadu. Its total capacity is more than 90,000,000,000 cubic feet (90 tmc ft). The dam, which was completed in 1934, and the creation of the reservoir caused the submersion of two villages, all of whose inhabitants were relocated to Mettur.

Krishna Raja Sagara, is the name of both a lake and the dam that creates it. The dam, completed in 1924, is across Kaveri River, in Mandya District near Mysore in Karnataka state, India.

Finally, the huge Kabini Reservoir is situated along the Kabini River, close to the town of H D Kote. The backwaters of the Kabini Reservoir are very rich in wildlife especially in summer when the water level recedes to form rich grassy meadows. The Kabini Dam is 2,284 feet (696 m) in height with a gross storage of 19.52tmcft but has reduced considerably due to silt accumulation.

Sediments in the Palk Strait, between India and Sri Lanka

10.3N 79.8E

June 12th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Palk Strait, India and Sri Lanka - June 8th, 2009

Palk Strait, India and Sri Lanka - June 8th, 2009

Tan sediments between southern India (above) and Sri Lanka (below) give a greenish hue to the waters of the Palk Strait.

The sediments are densest off Point Calimere, also called Cape Calimere and Kodikkarai (top center), a low headland on the Coromandel Coast, in the Nagapattinam district of the state of Tamil Nadu, India.

It is the apex of the Cauvery River delta, from which the sediments are flowing, and marks a nearly right-angle turn in the coastline.

The land around Point Calimere is green from the Vedaranyam forests covering the cape, one of the last remnants of the dry evergreen forests that were once typical of the East Deccan dry evergreen forest ecoregion.

The Point Calimere Wildlife Sanctuary, with an area of 24.17 km², includes the cape and its three natural habitat types: dry evergreen forests, mangrove forests, and wetlands.

However, pesticide residues running off from agricultural fields and shrimp farms has entered the ecosystem, harming animals and the water quality.

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