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Posts tagged Caucasus Mountains

Mountains Framing Black Sea

41.8N 40.9E

April 23rd, 2012 Category: Mountains

Black Sea - January 2nd, 2012

This wide-swath ASAR image shows part of the Black Sea, which has a total area of 436,400 km2 (168,500 sq mi), a maximum depth of 2,212 m (7,257 ft), and a volume of 547,000 km3 (131,200 cu mi). The Black Sea forms in an east-west trending elliptical depression which lies between Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Russia, Turkey, and Ukraine. It is constrained by the Pontic Mountains to the south, the Caucasus Mountains to the east. This image shows the contours of the mountains by its eastern shoreline, by Turkey and Georgia.

Lakes and Mountains Between Black and Caspian Seas

42.9N 44.2E

March 23rd, 2012 Category: Lakes

Black and Caspian Seas - March 20th, 2012

Two huge bodies of water: the Black Sea (left) and the Caspian Sea (right) can be observed by the edge of this image. Stretching between the two are the Caucasus Mountains.

Also visible between the seas, in the lower part of the image, are the dark blue Lake Van, in Turkey (below, center), the bright green Lake Urmia, in Iran (right of the former), and Lake Sevan, in Armenia (center). Lakes Van and Sevan are surrounded by snow, while Lake Urmia is ringed by white salt flats.

The South Caucasus Region by the Caspian Sea

September 23rd, 2011 Category: Lakes, Mountains

Georgia - September 9th, 2011

The Caucasus is a geopolitical region at the border of Europe and Asia. It is home to the Caucasus Mountains, including Europe’s highest mountain (Mount Elbrus). This image focuses on the South Caucasus, a geopolitical region located on the border of Eastern Europe and Southwest Asia, also referred to as Transcaucasia, or The Trans-Caucasus.

More specifically, the South Caucasus area spans the southern portion of the Caucasus Mountains and its lowlands, straddles the border between the two continents of Europe and Asia, extends from the southern part of the Greater Caucasus mountain range of southwestern Russia southerly to the Turkish and Armenian borders, and from the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea coast of Iran.

The area includes the southern part of the Greater Caucasus Mountain range, the entire Lesser Caucasus Mountain range, the Colchis Lowlands and Kura-Aras Lowlands, the Talysh Mountains, the Lenkoran Lowlands, Javakheti and the Armenian highlands. The Transcaucasus, or South Caucasus area, is a part of the entire Caucasus geographical region that essentially divides the Eurasian transcontinent into two.

All of Armenia is in Southern Caucasus; the majority of Georgia and Azerbaijan, including the exclave of Naxçivan, fall within this area.

Caucasus Mountains and Lakes Van, Urmia and Sevan in Eurasia – August 25th, 2011

41.5N 44.8E

August 25th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Mountains

Caspian Sea - July 26th, 2011

The Caucasus Mountains stretch between the Black Sea (left) and the Caspian Sea (right) in the Caucasus region of Eurasia. The Caucasus Mountains include the Greater Caucasus Mountain Range and
the Lesser Caucasus Mountains.

The Greater Caucasus Range extends from the Caucasian Natural Reserve in the vicinity of Sochi on the northeastern shore of the Black Sea, generally trending east-southeast and reaching nearly to Baku on the Caspian Sea, while the Lesser Caucasus runs parallel to the greater range, at a distance averaging about 100 km (62 mi) south.

Visible to the south of the mountains are three lakes arranged in a triangle: Lake Van, in Turkey (left), the reddish Lake Urmia, in Iran (right), and Lake Sevan, in Armenia. Each is the largest lake in its respective country.

The Black Sea, from the Danube Delta in the West to the Caucasus Mountains in the East – June 15th, 2011

43.7N 33.8E

June 15th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Mountains

Black Sea - May 18th, 2011

The Black Sea occupies the majority of this image. It has an area of 436,400 km2 (168,500 sq mi), not including the Sea of Azov (the body of water northeast of the Crimean Peninsula that is lined with sediments and connected to the Black Sea by the Strait of Kerch).

The Black Sea forms in an east-west trending elliptical depression which lies between Bulgaria, Georgia, Romania, Russia, Turkey, and Ukraine. The longest east-west extent is about 1,175 km.

It is constrained by the Pontic Mountains to the south, the Caucasus Mountains (capped with snow by the right edge) to the east and features a wide shelf to the northwest. Visible on the western shores is the delta of the Danube River.

 

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