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Posts tagged Cascade Mountains

The Sutter Buttes in California’s Sacramento Valley, USA – November 18th, 2009

39.1N 121.6W

November 18th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

California, USA - October 22nd, 2009

California, USA - October 22nd, 2009

Rising up above the agricultural areas and flat plains of the Sacramento Valley, which stretches between the Coastal Mountains (left) and the Cascade Mountains (right) in this orthorectified image, are the Sutter Buttes.

The Sutter Buttes are a small circular complex of eroded volcanic lava domes. The highest peak, South Butte, reaches about 2,130 feet (650 m) above sea level. The Buttes are located just outside of Yuba City, California in the Sacramento Valley, the northern part of the Central Valley.

The mountains are about 10 miles (16 km) from north to south and east to west, and are the smallest mountain range in the world. They were formed over 1.5 million years ago by a now-extinct volcano.

Fires in Southern Oregon Triple in Size

43.7N 122.4W

September 23rd, 2009 Category: Fires

Oregon Wildfires, USA - September 22nd, 2009

Oregon Wildfires, USA - September 22nd, 2009

Close-up of fires

Close-up of fires

The two fires blazing northwest of Crater Lake in southern Oregon, USA, continue to rage. They appear to have intensified since the last time they were observed two days ago, as thicker plumes of smoke can be seen blowing to the southwest (click here for previous article).

The larger of the two wildfires (below), called the Boze fire, is located nine miles southwest of Toketee Falls in the Umpqua National Forest, in the Cascade Mountains. Firefighters estimate that the blaze is affecting 2,100 acres and is currently 35 percent contained.

The smaller blaze is part of the Tumblebug Complex. It is located 23 miles southeast of Oakridge, in the Willamette National Forest, also in the Cascades. Firefighters report that 1,500 acres are being affected and the fire is only 10 percent contained.

Originally, the Tumblebug Complex consisted of 25 fires in the Willamette National Forest, caused by a September 12th lightning storm. All but two of the fires have been contained, and the two fires have converged and are being managed as one fire.

This remaining fire in the Tumblebug Complex has more than tripled in size over the last few days due to strong, persistent winds and an abundance of dry fuels. Gusts up to 35 miles per hour and extremely dry fuel conditions resulted in fire growth to 2240 acres on September 21st. Helicopters were forced to stand down for several hours due to the strong winds. Crews, too, had to pull back for much of the day as significant fire behavior kept them from being able to directly attack the fire.

Fire in Southern Oregon’s Umpqua National Forest

42.8N 122.1W

September 21st, 2009 Category: Fires, Volcanoes

Oregon Wildfires, USA - September 20th, 2009

Oregon Wildfires, USA - September 20th, 2009

Close-up of main fire

Close-up of main fire

Two fires blaze in southern Oregon, USA, northwest of the round Crater Lake. The larger of the two wildfires, releasing a plume of smoke to the southwest, is located in the Umpqua National Forest, in the Cascade Mountains. The smaller blaze is situated in the Willamette National Forest, also in the Cascades.

The Umpqua National Forest covers an area of one-million acres (4,000 km²), including stands of hemlock, true fir, Douglas-fir and cedar transition to lower elevation forests of mixed conifers and hardwoods. Timbered valleys of old-growth ponderosa and groves of oak also separate mountain peaks.

The Willamette National Forest, on the other hand, contains 1,675,407 acres (6,780.13 km²), making it one of the largest national forests. The forest’s dominant tree species is the Douglas-fir, although over one dozen other conifer species are common there as well.

Further to the south, across the California border, is the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, where the conical, white-tipped peak of the Mount Shasta  stratovolcano can be seen (bottom right corner).

California’s Sacramento Valley, Between the Coastal and Cascade Mountains

39.6N 122.4W

July 16th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

California, USA - June 30th, 2009

California, USA - June 30th, 2009

The Sacramento Valley stretches between the Coastal Mountains (left) and the Cascade Mountains (right) in California, USA.

Here, the Coastal Mountains include the peak known as Pence Mountain, a summit in Colusa County that climbs to 1,857 feet (566.01 meters) above sea level.

The Cascades, on the other hand, include a peak called Promontory Point, a summit in Tehama County that reaches  3,589 feet (1,093.93 meters) above sea level.

A small, seemingly out-of-place peak can also be seen in the middle of the valley, at the bottom of this  orthorectified image. These are the Twin Peaks, comprised of North Butte and South Butte, part of the Sutter Buttes.

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