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Posts tagged Buenos Aires Province

Sediments from Bahía Blanca to Samborombón Bay, Argentina

38.1S 57.9W

May 14th, 2012 Category: Sediments

Argentina - May 13th, 2012

Sediments can be seen along part of the coastline of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. They are particularly dense by Bahía Blanca (center left edge), where the Naposta Stream flows past Bermejo Island and Trinidad Island, into the Atlantic Ocean. While the central part of the coastline shows fewer sediments, another dense load is visible in the lower part of Samborombón Bay, at the end of the Rio de la Plata Estuary, in the upper right corner. There, the sediments appear darker in color than those by Bahía Blanca.

Sediments in Estuary of Bahía Blanca, Argentina

38.7S 62.2W

January 3rd, 2012 Category: Sediments

Argentina - December 24th, 2011

The sediments in the Estuary of Bahía Blanca, in Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, come from the Arroyo Napostá (Naposta Stream). It is a stream whose watershed is located in Sierra de la Ventana, about 120 km north east of the city of Bahía Blanca. Unfortunately Napostá is heavily contaminated distally, even before reaching the city, probably due to techniques of fertilization carried out in the areas which form its watershed.

Bahía Blanca is a city located in the south-west of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, by the Atlantic Ocean. The city has an important sea port with a depth of 45 feet (15 mt), kept constant upstream almost all along the length of the bay, where the Naposta Stream drains. Bahía Blanca means “White Bay”. The name is due to the typical colour of the salt covering the soils surrounding the shores.

The Pampas and Sediments Near Bahía Blanca, Argentina

37S 64.1W

July 6th, 2011 Category: Sediments

Argentina - June 17th, 2011

Sediments line the coast near Bahía Blanca, Argentina, giving the waters there a greenish tinge. While the land near the shore and in the upper right quadrant is part of Buenos Aires Province, that in the upper left quadrant is part of La Pampa province, and that to the lower left is in Neuquén province.

Situated in the middle of the pampas, the low, flat steppe receives 500 mm of rain a year, diminishing towards the West. The low humidity and temperate weather result in high contrast in temperature between day and night, which is reflected in the vegetation of the region.

Sediments by Bahía Blanca, Argentina – April 11th, 2010

38.7S 62.2W

April 11th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

Argentina - February 25th, 2010

Argentina - February 25th, 2010

Bahía Blanca is a city located in the south-west of the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina, by the Atlantic Ocean. The city has an important sea port with a depth of 45 feet (15 mt), kept constant upstream almost all along the length of the bay, into which the Naposta Stream drains.

Bahía Blanca means “White Bay”. The name is due to the typical colour of the salt covering the soils surrounding the shores. The bay (which is actually an estuary) was seen by Ferdinand Magellan during the first circumnavigation around the world. Here, sediments from the Naposta Stream spill into the bay and out into the Atlantic Ocean.

Bahía Blanca and Valdés Peninsula, Argentina – August 21st, 2009

40.8S 62.9W

August 21st, 2009 Category: Image of the day

Argentina - July 28th, 2009

Argentina - July 28th, 2009

Bahía Blanca

Bahía Blanca

Valdes Peninsula

Valdes Peninsula

Sediments line the eastern shores of the Argentina provinces of Buenos Aires, Río Negro and Chubut (from top to bottom).

These sediments appear most dense in Bahía Blanca (meaning White Bay, although it is actually an estuary), as can be seen in the close-up.

The other close-up focuses on the Valdes Peninsula (called Península Valdés in Spanish) in the north east of Chubut Province, Argentina.

With a surface area of about 3,625 km², most of the peninsula is barren land with some salt lakes. The largest of these lakes is at an elevation of about 40 m below sea level.

The peninsula is an important nature reserve which was listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1999. The coastline is inhabited by marine mammals, like sea lions, elephant seals and fur seals. Southern right whales can be found in Golfo Nuevo (below) and Golfo San José (above), protected bodies of water located between the peninsula and the Patagonian mainland.

These baleen whales come here between May and December, for mating and giving birth, because the water in the gulf is quieter and warmer than in the open sea. Orcas can be found off the coast, in the open sea off the peninsula. In this area, they are known to beach themselves on shore to capture sea lions and elephant seals.

The inner part of the peninsula is inhabited by rheas, guanacos and maras. A high diversity and range of birds live in the peninsula as well; at least 181 bird species, 66 of which are migratory, live in the area, including the Antarctic Pigeon.

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