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Posts tagged British Columbia

Climate Change and Glaciers of Olympic Mountains, USA – April 1st, 2013

47.9N 124W

April 1st, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Image of the day, Mountains

USA and Canada – March 30th, 2013

Snow rests atop mountain ranges in Washington State, USA (below), and British Columbia (upper left) and Alberta (upper right), Canada. Visible as a circular area of snow near the coast are the Olympic Mountains, a mountain range on the Olympic Peninsula of western Washington.

The mountains, part of the Pacific Coast Ranges, are not especially high – Mount Olympus is the highest at 7,962 ft (2,427 m); however, the eastern slopes rise out of Puget Sound and the western slopes are separated from the Pacific Ocean by the 20 to 35 km (12 to 22 mi) wide Pacific Ocean coastal plain. There are glaciers within the range; however, they have shrunk rapidly in just decades, stark evidence of the ongoing impact of human-driven climate change.

Wildfires West of Great Slave Lake, Canada

59.6N 120.3W

September 26th, 2012 Category: Fires, Lakes

Canada – September 25th, 2012

A string of days with no new forest fires in Canada came to an end on Tuesday September 24. Plumes of smoke from fires west and southwest of the Great Slave Lake (upper right quadrant), in Canada, blow to the south and the southeast. The fires are located in the country’s Northwest Territories (above) as well as in the provinces of British Columbia (lower left) and Alberta (lower right).

While the fire hazard has diminished greatly in provinces such as Ontario, other Canadian provinces are still receiving hot weather that is driving up the fire danger. Ontario will be providing 33 personnel to Alberta on Monday September 24 to assist with the fire hazard in that province.

Fires in Northwestern Canada Near Great Slave Lake

61.6N 113.7W

August 20th, 2012 Category: Fires

Canada – August 18th, 2012

While wildfires continue to burn in western USA, here some can also be seen in Canada, near the border of British Columbia (lower left), Alberta (lower center and right) and the Northwest Territories (above). Smoke from the fires creates a hazy veil over the Great Slave Lake, visible in the upper right quadrant.

Salish Sea and Pacific Coast Ranges on Canada-USA Border

48.3N 123.3W

June 19th, 2012 Category: Mountains

USA and Canada - May 15th, 2012

The Salish Sea, visible in the upper left quadrant, is the intricate network of coastal waterways located between the south-western tip of the Canadian province of British Columbia, and the north-western tip the U.S. state of Washington. Its major bodies of water are the Strait of Georgia, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Puget Sound. The inland waterways of the Salish Sea are partially separated from the open Pacific Ocean (a pelagic zone) by Vancouver Island and the Olympic Peninsula. The latter is located in the state of Washington on the southern shores of the sea. The snow-capped mountains there are known as the Olympic Mountains and are part of the Pacific Coast Ranges.

Straits of Georgia and San Juan de Fuca, USA and Canada

49.3N 123.8W

July 28th, 2011 Category: Mountains

USA - July 25th, 2011

Two straits can be observed in this image of the border between British Columbia, Canada, and Washington State, USA. To the north is the Strait of Georgia, between Vancouver Island (as well as its nearby Gulf Islands) and the mainland coast of British Columbia, Canada. It is approximately 240 km long and varies in width from 18.5 to 55 kilometres (11.5 to 34 mi).

Archipelagos and narrow channels mark each end of the Strait of Georgia, the Gulf Islands and San Juan Islands in the south, and the Discovery Islands in the north. The main channels to the south are Haro Strait and Rosario Strait, which connect the Strait of Georgia to the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

The Strait of Juan de Fuca, visible south of the large Vancouver Island, is a large body of water about 95 mi long forming the principal outlet for the Georgia Strait and Puget Sound, connecting both to the Pacific Ocean. It provides part of the international boundary between the United States and Canada.

Visible at the top edge are the snow-capped peaks of the Pacific Ranges, the southernmost subdivision of the Coast Mountains portion of the Pacific Cordillera. Located entirely within British Columbia, Canada, they run northwest from the lower stretches of the Fraser River to Bella Coola.

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