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Posts tagged Bristol Channel

Sediments from River Severn in Bristol Channel, United Kingdom

51.4N 2.5W

July 17th, 2010 Category: Rivers, Sediments

United Kingdom - June 26th, 2010

United Kingdom - June 26th, 2010

Brown sediments stream from the River Severn, through the Bristol Channel, and into the North Atlantic Ocean. The channel is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from Devon and Somerset in South West England, and extending from the lower estuary of the River Severn to the North Atlantic Ocean.

It takes its name from the English city of Bristol and is over 30 miles (50 km) across at its widest point. At low tide large parts of the channel become mud flats due to the tidal range of 15 metres (49 ft).

Sediments in the Bristol Channel Between Wales and Southwestern England, United Kingdom – April 9th, 2010

51.4N 3.1W

April 9th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Rivers, Sediments

United Kingdom - March 5th, 2010

United Kingdom - March 5th, 2010

Sediments line the southern and western coasts of the United Kingdom, appearing densest where they flow out of the Bristol Channel, between Wales (above) and southwest England (below). The channel extends from the lower estuary of the River Severn to that part of the North Atlantic Ocean known as the Celtic Sea.

The geography of Wales accounts for less than a tenth of the total area of the UK, covering 20,758 square kilometres (8,010 sq mi). Wales is mostly mountainous, though South Wales is less mountainous than North and mid Wales.

Wide-swath View of the United Kingdom – September 25th, 2009

51.5N 0.1W

September 25th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

United Kingdom - August 28th, 2009

United Kingdom - August 28th, 2009

London

London

Scottish coast

Scottish coast

Wales

Wales

The main image here is an orthorectified wide-swath ASAR (radar) image of three of the four countries in the United Kingdom: England, Scotland and Wales. It is possible to observe this large area due to the fact that the swath is five times wider than a normal IMM image.

The close-ups, on the other hand, concentrate on smaller sections of the countries. The first close-up shows the mountainous coastline and lochs of northern Scotland.

The second shows the capital city of London, England on the Thames River. Some ships can be seen in the Thames Estuary.

Finally, the third close-up depicts the River Severn flowing into the Bristol Channel near the city of Cardiff, Wales.

The Bristol Channel, United Kingdom

51.3N 3.1W

June 2nd, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Wales and Southwestern England - May 11th, 2009

Wales and Southwestern England - May 11th, 2009

Sediments flowing from the mouth of the River Severn cloud the waters of the Bristol Channel, which extends from the lower estuary of the River Severn to that part of the North Atlantic Ocean known as the Celtic Sea. It also separates South Wales from Devon and Somerset in South West England, and is over 50 km (30 mi) at its widest point.

At low tide large parts of the channel become mud flats due to the tidal range of 15 metres (49 ft), second only to Bay of Fundy in Eastern Canada.

The Bristol Channel is an important area for wildlife, in particular waders, and has several protected areas. Development schemes have been proposed along the channel, including an airport and a tidal barrier for electricity generation, but conservation issues have so far managed to block such schemes.

Coastline of United Kingdom and Ireland – May 29th, 2009

54.5N 6.3W

May 29th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

United Kingdom and Ireland - May 11th, 2009

United Kingdom and Ireland - May 11th, 2009

This virtually cloudless view of the United Kingdom and Ireland gives a clear of the countries’ coastlines, particularly in Scotland (upper left). While the northern coastlines are mostly clear, those to the south are flanked by sediments.

The River Severn, on the border of Wales and England, is spilling dark brown sediments into the Bristol Channel. At the same time, on the other side of the island nation, the River Thames is discharging tan sediments into the North Sea.

Inland, most of the terrain appears dark green or brown, though several areas stand out, including the tan colored Dartmoor (below the River Severn).

This is an area of moorland in the centre of Devon, England, covering 954 square kilometres (368 sq mi). The moorland is capped with many exposed granite hilltops (known as tors), providing habitats for wildlife.