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Posts tagged Bear River Bay

The Wasatch Range, East of the Great Salt Lake, USA – December 26th, 2009

41.0N 112.4W

December 26th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

USA - December 1st, 2009

USA - December 1st, 2009

The Wasatch Range is a mountain range that stretches about 160 miles (260 km) from the Utah-Idaho border, south through central Utah in the western United States. It is generally considered the western edge of the greater Rocky Mountains, and the eastern edge of the Great Basin region.

The northern extension of the Wasatch Range, the Bear River Mountains, extends into Idaho from northern Utah after running east of the Great Salt Lake in this orthorectified image.

North of the Lucin Cutoff, a causeway crossing the lake that appears here as a white line, are a series of bays that extend towards the mountains. These bays of the Great Salt Lake include Bear River Bay, Willard Bay, North Bay and South Bay.

Evaporation Ponds of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA – June 6th, 2009

41.1N 112.6W

June 6th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA - June 2nd, 2009

Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA - June 2nd, 2009

Evaporation ponds, northeast

Evaporation ponds, northeast

Evaporation ponds, southwest

Evaporation ponds, southwest

The Great Salt Lake in northern Utah, USA, is the largest salt lake in the western hemisphere, famous for its very high salinity that makes its water far saltier than that of the sea.

Salt Lake City and its suburbs are located to the southeast and east of the lake, between the lake and the Wasatch Mountains, but land around the north and west shores is almost uninhabited.

Of particular interest in this ASAR image are the salt evaporation ponds on the northeastern and southwestern parts of the lake. Salt evaporation ponds are shallow man-made ponds designed to produce salts from sea water, or in this case, highly saline lake water.

The salty water is fed into large ponds and water is drawn out through natural evaporation, which allows the salt to be subsequently harvested.  The ponds are commonly separated by levees, which are visible here as white lines across the black water.

The close-up of the southwestern area shows evaporation ponds between the shoreline of Lakeside Valley (left) and Stansbury Island (right). The two mountain ranges visible are the similarly named Lakeside Mountains (left) and the Stansbury Mountains (bottom). The various mountain ranges seen here are very sharp and detailed, as the image has been orthorectified.

The other close-up focuses on the evaporation ponds in the northeastern area, between Bear River Bay (left) and Willard Bay (right).  The mountain range jutting into the lake is called the Promontory Mountains, with Fremont Island below. The long, white long stretching from the mainland, crossing the southern end of Promontory Peninsula, and then heading westward, is a railway line on a long causeway called the Lucin Cutoff.