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Posts tagged Bay of Karkinit

The Sivash Sea, Ukraine and Crimea

February 20th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

The Sivash Sea, Ukraine and Crimea - February 19th, 2009

The Sivash Sea, Ukraine and Crimea - February 19th, 2009

Parts of Ukraine (above) and the Crimean Peninsula (below) are visible here, dotted by fields. These two landmasses are connected by the Isthmus of Perekop, with a width of 5–7 kilometers (3–4 miles), left.

Some interesting wavelike cloud patterns can be observed over Ukraine.

To the West we can see the Bay of Karkinit in the Black Sea, while the Sea of Azov is visible to the East. An algal bloom is present in both bodies of water, though it is more dense in the Sea of Azov.

These two seas are connected by the Sivash Sea, also known as the Putrid Sea. It is a salt lagoon, about 1,000 sq mi (2,590 sq km), extending along the northeastern coast of Crimea. Its shallow waters have a strong content of sediments, salt and algae, turning them a greenish-tan color.

Border Between Ukraine and Crimea

January 18th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Border between Ukraine and Crimea - November 28th, 2008

Border between Ukraine and Crimea - November 28th, 2008

This image shows us the border between Ukraine and Crimea, a peninsula.

Crimea is connected to the mainland of Ukraine by the 5–7 kilometre (3–4 mile) wide Isthmus of Perekop, visible on the left although slightly obscured by clouds.

To the West we can see the Bay of Karkinit in the Black Sea, while the Sea of Azov is visible to the East.

The waters between the Sea of Azov and the Isthmus of Perekop appear more shallow and filled with sediments, making the water a greenish-tan color.

This area is known as the Sivash Sea, or Putrid Sea. It is a salt lagoon, about 1,000 sq mi (2,590 sq km),  extending along the northeastern coast of Crimea.

It is separated—except at the Genichesk Strait—from the Sea of Azov by the Arabat Tongue, a narrow sandspit circa 70 mi (110 km) long; the Perekop Isthmus separates it from the Black Sea in the north.

The sea is a complex system of shallow inlets, straits, and sandbars. The water, which has a salt content of up to 20%, has been the source of table salt and of several chemicals, including bromine.

source Wikipedia

Algal Bloom along Crimean Coast – January 8th, 2009

January 8th, 2009 Category: Image of the day

Algal Bloom along Crimean Coast - November 25th, 2008

Algal Bloom along Crimean Coast - November 25th, 2008

In this image we can see parts of Ukraine and Crimea by the Black Sea: the western part of the Crimean Peninsula is visible on the right, while the Ukrainian mainland is visible at the top.

Crimea, an autonomous republic of Ukraine with a total land area of about 26,100 km² (10,038 sq mi), is a peninsula whose coastline is broken by several bays and harbors.

In the lower right quadrant we have the Bay of Kalamita; in the center, the Bay of Karkinit, with the Dnieper River to the Northwest.

The river appears dark blue and free of sediments, whereas the bays contain green algal blooms.

On land, to the East of the Bay of Kalamita we can see where the Green Mountains fall abruptly into the Black Sea, whereas the terrain north of the bay is flatter and used for agriculture.

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