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Posts tagged Bay of Campeche

Rich, Sediment-Laden Lagoons Composing Términos Lagoon, Mexico – April 23rd, 2012

18.6N 91.5W

April 23rd, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Mexico - April 14th, 2012

Sediments and phytoplankton growth gives the waters of the Términos Lagoon a bright green color. This body of water is made up of a series of rich, sediment-laden lagoons and tidal estuaries connected by two channels to the Bay of Campeche in the southern part of Gulf of Mexico. It is located in Carmen Municipality in the southwestern part of the Mexican state of Campeche.

The lagoon’s shores are swampy and support mangroves, and twenty-nine percent of the lagoon is covered with seagrass. It is fed by several fresh water rivers, including the Mezcapala, Grijalva and Usumacinta Rivers, and includes several lagoons such as Pom, Atasta, Puerto Rico, Este and Panlau. It is about 112.5 square km in area (about 50 miles long and 20 miles wide). Every nine days, approximately 50% of the lagoon’s water volume is renewed, primarily through the effect of ocean tides.

Sediment-Laden Laguna de Términos, Mexico – January 31st, 2011

18.5N 91.5W

January 31st, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Sediments

Mexico - January 15th, 2011

The Laguna de Términos (Términos Lagoon) is made up of a series of rich, sediment-laden lagoons and tidal estuaries connected by two channels to the Bay of Campeche in the southern part of Gulf of Mexico, in the southwestern part of the Mexican state of Campeche.

Here, the rich sediments can be seen in the lagoon itself and also spreading along the coastline. The lagoon is about 112.5 square km in area (about 50 miles long and 20 miles wide). Twenty-nine percent of the lagoon is covered with seagrass.

Sediments in Términos Lagoon and on Western Coast of Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico

19.6N 90.4W

November 19th, 2010 Category: Sediments

Mexico - November 9th, 2010

Green sediments line the coast of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico, particularly along its western shores. The sediments appear teal green between the center and the top of the image, but dark green as one moves westward.

The Laguna de Términos (Términos Lagoon) is also filled with dark green sediments. It is located in the southwestern part of the Mexican state of Campeche, and is connected to the Bay of Campeche by two channels. The lagoon is best observed in the full image, by the western coast near where the sediments change in color from dark green to teal.

Sediments in the Bay of Campeche by the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico – February 1st, 2010

18.6N 91.8W

February 1st, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Sediments

Mexico - January 26th, 2010

Mexico - January 26th, 2010

Laguna de Términos

Laguna de Términos

Sediments create a greenish halo around the western and northwestern shores of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico, reaching far out into the waters of the Bay of Campeche. The bay is the southern bight of the Gulf of Mexico. It is surrounded on three sides by the Mexican states of Campeche, Tabasco and Veracruz.

The close-up focses on the Laguna de Términos (Términos Lagoon), which is connected by two channels to the Bay of Campeche, in the southwestern part of the Mexican state of Campeche. It is actually not one sole lagoon, but rather is composed of a series of rich, sediment-laden lagoons and tidal estuaries. The Isla del Carmen, on which Ciudad del Carmen is located, can be seen between the lagoon and the Bay of Campeche.

Laguna de Términos on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

18.6N 91.5W

December 11th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Mexico - November 17th, 2009

Mexico - November 17th, 2009

The Laguna de Términos (Términos Lagoon), in the lower left quadrant, is located along the coast of the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico. It is made up of a series of rich, sediment-laden lagoons and tidal estuaries connected by two channels to the Bay of Campeche in the southern part of Gulf of Mexico.

The lagoon is about 112.5 square km in area (about 50 miles long and 20 miles wide). Twenty-nine percent of the lagoon is covered with seagrass, and its are swampy and support mangroves.

It is fed with fresh water by several rivers, including the Mezcapala, Grijalva and Usumacinta Rivers. Every nine days, approximately 50% of the lagoon’s water volume is renewed, primarily through the effect of ocean tides.