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Posts tagged Banks Peninsula

Climate Change Issues for East Coast of New Zealand – May 15th, 2013

43.7S 172.8E

May 15th, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Image of the day

New Zealand – May 12th, 2013

Climate change models for the East Coast of New Zealand predict less rain and warmer temperatures than at present in the decades to come. The rate of sea level rise, currently running at over 0.2mm per annum, is projected to increase significantly due to thermal expansion and polar ice melts. These incremental changes to our weather and to the marine environment are anticipated to be magnified by periodic extreme events.

The Banks Peninsula Zone (bottom edge) with its extensive coastline and dependence on surface water will most likely be significantly affected by climate change. Whilst overall rainfall is expected to decrease by about 10% it is predicted that there will be a higher occurrence of intense rainfall events resulting in the flooding of low-lying areas, and an increased risk of slips and road closures.

At the other end of the extreme events scale the likelihood of drought is expected to double. This will impact on water supply and primary industry, and increase the risk of fire. Strong winds, predominantly from the West, combined with higher temperatures and low humidity would be likely to exacerbate the fire risk further.

In addition, the predicted sea level rise caused by climate change will impact negatively on the coastal margins of the Zone. Estimates of the rise in mean sea levels vary between 50cm and 80cm by 2090. In this scenario, low lying areas will be affected by erosion and inundation, and at times of high tides and storm surges these incursions will be increased (click here for more information).

Lake Ellesmere / Te Waihora by Banks Peninsula, New Zealand – December 9th, 2011

43.7S 172.4E

December 9th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

New Zealand - November 25th, 2011

Lake Ellesmere / Te Waihora, tan in color, is located in the Canterbury Region of the South Island of New Zealand. It is actually a broad, shallow lagoon located directly to the west of Banks Peninsula, separated from the Pacific Ocean by a long narrow sandy spit called Kaitorete Spit, or more correctly Kaitorete Barrier.

The Banks Peninsula is a peninsula of volcanic origin on the east coast of the South Island of New Zealand. It has an area of approximately 1,150 square kilometres (440 sq mi) and encompasses two large harbours and many smaller bays and coves. The South Island’s largest city, Christchurch is located immediately north of the peninsula.

Phytoplankton East of Banks Peninsula, New Zealand

42.9S 174.0E

November 27th, 2011 Category: Phytoplankton, Sediments

New Zealand - November 21st, 2011

The faint swirls of a phytoplankton bloom can be observed in the waters off the coast of New Zealand, east of the Banks Peninsula on the country’s South Island. Part of the North Island can be observed north of the bloom, at the top edge.

The bright bluish-green water framing the coastline of the peninsula is probably sediment re-suspended from the ocean floor by waves and tides, or washed into the ocean through rivers. In several places along the shoreline, tan sediments can be seen pouring into the ocean directly at the mouths of rivers.

High Vegetation Index Near Banks Peninsula, New Zealand

41.8S 173.5E

November 5th, 2011 Category: Vegetation Index

New Zealand - November 4th, 2011

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of New Zealand’s North Island (above) and South Island (below). The two islands are separated by the Cook Strait, which is 22 km (14 mi) wide at its narrowest point.

The vegetation index throughout the image is generally good (green) to high (rusty red), particularly on the North Island and eastern coast of the South Island, near the Banks Peninsula. A few areas of low photosynthetic activity (yellow) can be observed in the higher altitudes of the Southern Alps.

Contours of the Banks Peninsula, New Zealand – July 10th, 2011

43.5S 172.6E

July 10th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Mountains

New Zealand - July 7th, 2011

Visible on the right side of this orthorectified image is the Banks Peninsula, a peninsula of volcanic origin on the east coast of the South Island of New Zealand. It has an area of approximately 1,150 square kilometres (440 sq mi) and encompasses two large harbours and many smaller bays and coves.

The South Island’s largest city, Christchurch, is located immediately north of the peninsula. It appears here as a large white area. Near the city and west of the peninsula are the Canterbury Plains, formed from the erosion of the Southern Alps and from the alluvial fans created by large braided rivers. These plains reach their widest point where they meet the hilly sub-region of Banks Peninsula.

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