Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Baku

Environmental Issues Facing Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan

40.4N 49.8E

February 8th, 2013 Category: Climate Change

Caspian Sea – January 24th, 2013

The Absheron Peninsula is a peninsula in Azerbaijan that extends 37 miles (60 km) eastward into the Caspian Sea, and reaches a maximum width of 19 miles (30 km). Though technically the easternmost extension of the Caucasus Mountains, the landscape is only mildly hilly, a gently undulating plain that ends in a long spit of sand dunes known as Shah Dili, and now declared the Absheron National Park. In this part the peninsula is dissected by ravines and characterized by frequent salt lakes.

The peninsula is also host to Baku, the biggest and the most populous city of the country, and also the Baku metropolitan area, with its satellite cities Sumgayit and Khyrdalan. As approx. 40% of the country’s population and 70% of the industrial potential of the country is concentrated in the Absheron peninsula, most of the ecological problems in urgent need of solution exist in this area.

One of the primary problems of the Absheron peninsula is related to the contamination of land, mainly with oil and layer waters during oil-gas extraction and drilling works, formation of artificial lakes and pons due to failure to control layer waters, and accumulation of wastes in these territories formed during oil refining process.

Another ecological problem is connected with the situation of sewage systems, with much being discharged into the Sea and internal water basins without being purified. Along with the waste waters oil products, suspension substances, sulphate compounds, chloride salts, superficially active substances, fenol and different other heavy metals are also discharged into water basins (click here for more information).

Georgia, Between the Greater Caucasus Mountains and Pontic Mountains

January 20th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Georgia, Between the Greater Caucasus Mountains and Pontic Mountains - December 2nd, 2008

Georgia, Between the Greater Caucasus Mountains and Pontic Mountains - December 2nd, 2008

Snow caps the the southern side of the Greater Caucasus Mountain Range (above) and the peaks of the Pontic Mountains (below).  They are separated by the Black Sea and a green valley, including the Kolkhida Lowlands by the shore.

Many rivers can be seen flowing down the mountainside; most are tan in color due to sediments, while one, just north of the Kolkhida Lowlands, is a striking turquoise green.

Part of these ranges is within the borders of the country of Georgia, which also occupies the lowlands between them.

The Caucasus Mountains are in Eurasia between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. They are comprised of two separate mountain systems: the Greater Caucasus Mountain Range and the Lesser Caucasus Mountains.

The Greater Caucasus Range extends from the Caucasian Natural Reserve in the vicinity of Sochi on the northeastern shore of the Black Sea, generally trending east-southeast and reaching nearly to Baku on the Caspian Sea, while the Lesser Caucasus runs parallel to the greater range, at a distance averaging about 100 km (60 mi) south.

The Greater and Lesser Caucasus ranges are connected by the Likhi Range, which separates the Kolkhida Lowlands (close to the shore) from the Kura Depression (Kura Lowland, far right).

The highest peak in the Caucasus range is Mount Elbrus in the Greater Caucasus, which rises to a height of 18,506 feet (5,642 meters) above sea level.

The Pontic Mountains, on the other hand, are a range of mountains in northern Turkey, whose eastern end extends into southeastern Georgia. The range runs roughly east-west, parallel and close to the southern coast of the Black Sea. The highest peak in the range is Kaçkar Dağı, which rises to 3942 meters elevation (12,933 feet).

The part of the mountains that is not snow capped appears dark green, as they are generally covered by dense forests, predominantly of conifers.

Absheron Peninsula and Baku, Azerbaijan – December 7th, 2008

December 7th, 2008 Category: Image of the day

Baku, Azerbaijan and Caspian Sea - November 24th, 2008

Absheron Peninsula and Baku, Azerbaijan and Caspian Sea - November 24th, 2008

In this image, phytoplankton swirl in the waters of the Caspian Sea, around the Absheron Peninsula in Azerbaijan.

The Absheron peninsula is a prominent geographical feature of Azerbaijan. It extends 37 miles (60 km) eastward into the Caspian Sea and reaches a maximum width of 19 miles (30 km).

Though technically the easternmost extension of the Caucasus Mountains, visible in the upper left quadrant, the peninsula’s landscape is only mildly hilly, a gently undulating plain that ends in a long spit of sand dunes known as Shah Dili, and now declared the Absheron National Park.

In part the peninsula is dissected by ravines and characterized by frequent salt lakes.

Baku, located on the southern shore of the Absheron Peninsula, is the capital, the largest city, and the largest port of Azerbaijan.  As of January 1, 2005 the population was 2,036,000.

The climate of the peninsula is hot and humid in the summer, and cool and wet in the winter. During the winter gale-force winds sweep through on occasion, driven by masses of polar air (strong northern winds Khazri and southern Gilavar are typical here); however, snow is rare at 28 m below sea level, and temperatures on the coast rarely drop to freezing.

source Wikipedia

About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

September 2019
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

37


Take Action

Widgets