Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Posts tagged Aswan High Dam

Lake Nasser Providing Water for New Valley Project, Egypt

22.5N 31.7E

May 9th, 2012 Category: Deserts, Lakes, Rivers

Egypt - May 8th, 2012

Lake Nasser, created as a result of the construction of the Aswan High Dam across the waters of the Nile between 1958 and 1971, is an important water source for Egypt (above) and Sudan (below). Visible to its west are the Toshka Lakes, filled by the overflow from Lake Nasser.

Some areas of agriculture can be seen in this extremely arid region, irrigated by Lake Nasser’s waters. Crops can be observed near the Nile in the upper right quadrant, and by the center left edge of the image. The latter are part of the New Valley Project (click link for images of how the area has grown), a system of canals built to carry water from Lake Nasser to irrigate the sandy wastes of the Western Desert of Egypt, which is part of the Sahara Desert.

Sun Glint Gives Lake Nasser a Silvery-White Glow, Egypt and Sudan

22.8N 32.5E

May 12th, 2010 Category: Lakes

Egypt - April 28th, 2010

Egypt - April 28th, 2010

Lake Nasser is a reservoir on the Nile River, in Egypt and northern Sudan. It was created by the impounding of the Nile’s waters by the Aswan High Dam, which was built in the 1960s and dedicated in 1971. Here, the lake appears a whitish-silvery color due to sun glint.

Lake Nasser has a gross capacity of 136,927,000 acre-feet (168,900,000,000 cubic metres), and its waters, when discharged downstream, have brought 800,000 acres (324,000 hectares) of additional land under irrigation and have converted 700,000 acres (283,000 hectares) from flood to perennial irrigation. The lake has been stocked with food fish.

Agriculture Between Toshka Lakes and Lake Nasser, Egypt

22.8N 32.5E

April 2nd, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Egypt - March 5th, 2010

Egypt - March 5th, 2010

The Nile River flows out of Lake Nasser, created by the Aswan High Dam, in Egypt, on its way northward to the Mediterranean Sea. The lake is some 550 km long and 35 km across at its widest point. It covers a total surface area of 5,250 km² in Egypt and Sudan and has a storage capacity of some 157 km³ of water.

of the reservoir are the Toshka Lakes, created by water drained from Lake Nasser in order to control its water level. This water is also used to irrigate crops in the region – here, some circular fields can be seen between Lake Nasser and the Toshka Lake located furthest eastward.

Waters of Lake Nasser Amidst Arid Desert, Egypt

22.4N 31.7E

November 4th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Egypt - October 7th, 2009

Egypt - October 7th, 2009

The navy blue waters of Lake Nasser, a vast reservoir in southern Egypt and northern Sudan, contrast against the surrounding arid desert. It was created as a result of the construction of the Aswan High Dam across the waters of the Nile between 1958 and 1970.

This image focuses on the upper reaches of the lake in Egypt, and the dam itself is in fact located near the top. Lake Nasser is some 550 km long and 35 km across at its widest point, also visible here. It covers a total surface area of 5,250 km² and has a storage capacity of some 157 km³ of water.

Aswan High Dam and Merowe High Dam, in Egypt and Sudan

April 26th, 2009 Category: Lakes

Egypt - April 5th, 2009

Egypt - April 5th, 2009

Two large hydroeletrical projects have created expansive lakes in Egypt and Sudan. Just above the center of the image is Lake Nasser, is a vast reservoir in southern Egypt and northern Sudan, created by the Aswan High Dam across the waters of the Nile.

The smaller lakes visible to the west of Lake Nasser are the Toshka Lakes, also created by the Aswan High Dam, although somewhat indirectly, as their waters come from drainage carried to a depression in the Sahara Desert via canals from the larger Lake Nasser.

Further south is a light green reservoir created by the Merowe High Dam, a large construction project in northern Sudan, about 350 km north of the capital Khartoum.  Merowe is a city about 40 km downstream from the construction site at Hamdab.

Also known as Merowe Multi-Purpose Hydro Project or Hamdab Dam, it is situated on the river Nile, close to the 4th Cataract where the river divides into multiple smaller branches with large islands in between.

The main purpose of the dam will be the generation of electricity. Its dimensions make it the largest contemporary hydropower project in Africa.