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Posts tagged Apalachicola Bay

Sediments in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, USA

29.6N 85W

October 31st, 2012 Category: Sediments

USA – October 26th, 2012

Sediments can be seen in Apalachicola Bay, an estuary and lagoon located on Florida’s northwest coast. The Apalachicola Bay system also includes St. Georges Sound (to the east), St. Vincent Sound and East Bay, covering an area of about 208 square miles (540 km2). Four islands St. Vincent Island to the west, Cape St. George Island and St. George Island to the south, and Dog Island to the east separate the system from the Gulf of Mexico. Water exchange occurs through Indian Pass, West Pass, East Pass and the Duer Channel.

The lagoon has been designated as a National Estuarine Research Reserve and the Apalachicola River is the largest source of freshwater to the estuary. Combined with the Chattahoochee River, Flint River, and Ochlockonee River they drain a watershed of over 20,000 square miles (50,000 km2) at a rate of 19,599 cubic feet (550 m3) per second according to the United States Geological Survey in 2002.

Fire Near Pensacola Bay, in Florida, USA

30.4N 87.2W

May 21st, 2012 Category: Fires

USA - May 20th, 2012

A plume of smoke from a fire near Pensacola, Florida, rises upwards, creating a thick cloud, before blowing towards the northeast. Partially visible through the smoke is Pensacola Bay. Visible west of the fire is Mobile Bay, Alabama, and at the far left is part of the sediment-laden Mississippi Delta, in Lousiana. Visible to the east of the fire is Choctawhatchee Bay, and at the far right is the sediment-filled Apalachicola Bay, in Florida.

 

Sediments in Apalachicola Bay, Florida, USA

29.6N 85W

December 1st, 2011 Category: Sediments

USA - November 21st, 2011

Sediments flow out of Apalachicola Bay, an estuary and lagoon located on Florida’s northwest coast. The lagoon has been designated as a National Estuarine Research Reserve and the Apalachicola River is the largest source of freshwater to the estuary. Combined with the Chattahoochee River, Flint River, and Ochlockonee River they drain a watershed of over 20000 sqmi at a rate of 19599 cubic feet per second.

The Apalachicola Bay system also includes St. Georges Sound, St. Vincent Sound and East Bay, covering an area of about 208 sqmi. Four islands: St. Vincent Island to the west, Cape St. George Island and St. George Island to the south, and Dog Island to the east, separate the system from the Gulf of Mexico. Water exchange occurs through Indian Pass, West Pass, East Pass and the Duer Channel.

Sediments from Mississippi Delta to Florida Peninsula, USA

33.5N 86.8W

December 27th, 2010 Category: Sediments

USA - December 23rd, 2010

This image focuses on the southern United States of America, from theĀ Mississippi River and Delta (lower left) to the Florida Peninsula (lower right).

Sediments flank the coastline by the delta and the west coast of the peninsula, as well as in and around Apalachicola Bay, an estuary and lagoon located on Florida’s northwest coast. The Apalachicola Bay system also includes St. Georges Sound, St. Vincent Sound and East Bay, covering an area of about 208 sqmi.

Inland, areas used mostly for agriculture appear mottled tan in color, while mountain ridges and hills appear darker brown. Cities such as Birmingham, Alabama (full image, just northeast of center) appear as grey areas.

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