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Posts tagged Albemarle Sound

Sunglint on Bays of USA’s East Coast

35.3N 75.8W

May 18th, 2013 Category: Climate Change

USA – May 10th, 2013

Sunglint reflecting off the Atlantic Ocean highlights the contours of bays along the East Coast of the United States of America: Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle Sound and Pamlico Sound (from top to bottom).

The Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System is one of the largest and most important in the United States. Covering approximately 7,530 square kilometers (2,900 square miles), the waters of the system comprise the second largest estuarine system on the East Coast of the United States, exceeded in area by only the Chesapeake Bay.

The Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine System is comprised of an extensive complex of creeks, rivers, swamps, marshes, and open water sounds dominating northeastern North Carolina. Tributaries originating in the mountains and piedmont serve as conduits from a major portion of North Carolina and southern Virginia. Albemarle Sound is the
drowned portion of the Roanoke River and its extensive floodplain.

The Coastal Plain of the Albemarle-Pamlico Region is widely recognized as among the USA’s most vulnerable landscapes to relative sea level rise and associated climate phenomena. The indicators “ambient air temperature,” “storm frequency and intensity,” and “relative sea level rise” all offer insights into the influence of climate stressors on the Albemarle-Pamlico ecosystem (click here for more information).

Bays and Sounds in North Carolina and Virginia, USA

37.2N 76W

May 5th, 2012 Category: Lakes

USA - April 17th, 2012

Sediments cloud two large sounds by the coast of North Carolina, separated from the Atlantic Ocean by a chain of low-laying, sandy barrier islands known as the Outer Banks. The light green sound is Pamlico Sound, and the greyish brown sound above it is Albemarle Sound.

The former is the largest lagoon along the east coast of the USA, with a length of 129 km (80 mi) and a width that ranges from 24 to 48 km (15 to 30 miles). The sediments in the sound come from rivers such as the Neuse and the Pamlico.

Visible to the north of the two sounds, in the upper right quadrant, is Cape Charles, a headland in Northampton County, Virginia. It forms the northern side of the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay. Cape Henry, which forms the southern side of the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay, and Cape Charles are collectively known as the Virginia Capes.

Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds, North Carolina, USA

35.3N 75.8W

April 11th, 2012 Category: Lakes

USA - April 9th, 2012

Two large sounds can be seen by the Atlantic Coast of the state of North Carolina: Pamlico Sound (greenish, below) and Albemarle Sound (darker green and brown, above). Both sounds are separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks, a row of low, sandy barrier islands.

Pamlico Sound is the largest lagoon along the U.S. East Coast, being 129 km (80 mi) long and 24 to 48 km (15 to 30 miles) wide. The Neuse and Pamlico rivers (the latter is the estuary of the Tar River) flow in from the west. Pamlico Sound is linked on the north with Albemarle Sound through Roanoke Sound and Croatan Sound (passages). Much of the water in the Albemarle Sound is brackish or fresh, as opposed to the saltwater of the ocean, as a result of river water pouring into the sound.

Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds by Coast of North Carolina, USA – January 8th, 2012

35.3N 75.8W

January 8th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

USA - January 4th, 2012

Visible by the coast of North Carolina, USA, are the Pamlico and Albemarle Sounds. The waters of the former appear greyish green in color, while those of the latter appear brownish. The two are linked by the passages of the Roanoke Sound and Croatan Sound.

Pamlico Sound is the largest lagoon along the U.S. East Coast, being 129 km long and 24 to 48 km (15 to 30 miles) wide. It is a body of water separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks, a row of low, sandy barrier islands. The sound and its ocean inlets are noted for wide expanses of shallow water and occasional shoaling, making the area hazardous for larger vessels.

Albemarle Sound is a large estuary located at the confluence of a group of rivers, including the Chowan and Roanoke. It is also separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks. Much of the water in the Albemarle Sound is brackish or fresh, as opposed to the saltwater of the ocean, as a result of river water pouring into the sound.

Pamlico and Albermarle Sounds, North Carolina, USA

36.0N 75.9W

February 12th, 2011 Category: Rivers

USA - January 16th, 2011

Pamlico Sound, in North Carolina, is the largest lagoon along the U.S. East Coast. Here its waters contain sediments and algae and are thus greenish in color. The sound is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks, a row of low, sandy barrier islands.

Another body of water can be seen just north of Pamlico Sound: Albemarle Sound, a large estuary also on the coast of North Carolina, also separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks. Darker in color than its southern neighbor, it is located at the confluence of a group of rivers, including the Chowan and Roanoke.

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