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Tropical Storm Emilia (05E) Southwest of Acapulco, Mexico

10.9N 101.4W

July 8th, 2012 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Emilia – July 7th, 2012

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Track of 05E - July 7th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 05E

A small but well-defined area of disturbed weather became organized enough to be declared as Tropical Depression Five-E on July 7, about 500 mi (800 km) SSW of Acapulco, Mexico. It is currently expected to steadily intensify into a Category 2 hurricane before entering cooler Sea Surface Temperatures (SST).

As of 8 p.m. PDT (0300 UTC July 8) July 7, Tropical Storm Emilia is located within 45 nautical miles of 10.7°N 103.2°W, about 580 mi (930 km) south of Manzanillo, Mexico and about 480 mi (775 km) south-southwest of Acapulco, Mexico. Maximum sustained winds are 35 knots (40 mph, 65 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 1003 mbar (hPa; 29.62 InHg), and the system is moving west-northwest at 14 kt (16 mph, 26 km/h).

Tropical Storm Aletta and Nearby Low Pressure Area

13.2N 108.9W

May 16th, 2012 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Aletta (01E) - May 16th, 2012

Tropical Storm Aletta (01E) - May 16th, 2012

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Track of Tropical Storm Aletta (01E) - May 16th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 01E

As of 2 p.m. PDT (2100 UTC) May 16, Tropical Storm Aletta (01E), the first storm of the 2012 Pacific Hurricane Season, is located within 30 nautical miles of 11.4°N 113.5°W, about 830 mi (1335 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.

Maximum sustained winds are 35 knots (40 mph, 65 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 1004 mbar (hPa; 29.65 InHg), and the system is moving west at 8 kt (9 mph, 15 km/h). Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 45 miles (75 km) from the center of Aletta.

Visible to the east of Aletta in the full images is a broad low pressure area located about 500 miles south of Acapulco, Mexico. It has changed little over the past several hours, although environmental conditions are generally conducive for slow development of this system during the next few days. This system has a medium chance (30 percent) of becoming a tropical cyclone during the next 48 hours as it moves slowly to the northwest.

Tropical Storm Aletta (01E) Off Coast of Mexico Marks Start of 2012 Hurricane Season – May 15th, 2012

17.5N 110.8W

May 15th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Aletta (01E) - May 14th, 2012

Tropical Storm Aletta (01E) - May 14th, 2012

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Track of Tropical Storm Aletta (01E) - May 14th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 01E

On May 12, the NHC reported that a tropical disturbance formed, about 550 miles south-southwest of Acapulco, Mexico. The storm quickly moved northwest before stalling, and then began to strengthen rapidly.

Early on May 14, the tropical disturbance intensified into a tropical depression, becoming the first storm of the season. Tropical Depression One-E formed one day before the official start of the 2012 Pacific hurricane season. This marks the first time that a tropical cyclone has formed before the official start of hurricane season, in the East Pacific basin since 1996, when Tropical Storm One-E formed on May 13, 1996.

Late on May 14, the storm intensified into Tropical Storm Aletta, with 40 mph (65 km/h) 1-minute sustained winds. As of 8 p.m. PDT (0300 UTC) May 15, Tropical Storm Aletta is located within 30 nautical miles of 10.5°N 108.5°W, about 650 mi (1045 km) south-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. Maximum sustained winds are 35 knots (40 mph, 65 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 1004 mbar (hPa; 29.65 InHg), and the system is moving west at 10 kt (12 mph, 19 km/h).

Acapulco on Semi-Circular Bay, Mexico

16.8N 99.8W

January 12th, 2012 Category: Lakes

Mexico - January 10th, 2012

Visible along the shoreline of Mexico is Acapulco, a city, municipality and major sea port in the state of Guerrero on the Pacific coast of Mexico. Acapulco is located on a deep, semi-circular bay. Forty percent of the municipality is mountainous terrain. Another forty percent is semi flat, and the other twenty percent is flat. Altitude varies from sea level to 1,699 metres (5,574 feet).

Moving westward up the coast and slightly inland in the full image, one comes to the reservoir created by the Infiernillo Dam, also known as Adolfo Lopez Mateos Dam. It is an embankment dam on the Balsas River near La Unión, Guerrero, Mexico. The dam supports a hydroelectric power station containing six turbine-generators for a total installed capacity of 1,120 MW.

Volcanoes and Mountain Peaks of Southern Mexico

19.0N 98.6W

February 11th, 2010 Category: Volcanoes

Mexico - January 26th, 2010

Mexico - January 26th, 2010

While the famous resort city of Acapulco is visible near the bottom of this image of Mexico, the snow-capped peaks of several volcanoes and mountains can be observed near the top. Towards the upper center is a line of three mountains: (from bottom to top) Popocatépetl, Iztaccíhuatl and Mount Tlaloc. East of these three is La Malinche mountain, and west of the three is Nevado de Toluca.

Popocatépetl is an active volcano and, at 5,426 m (17,800 ft), the second highest peak in Mexico after the Pico de Orizaba (5,636 m/18,490 ft). Popocatépetl is linked to the Iztaccíhuatl volcano to the north by the high saddle known as the Paso de Cortés, and lies in the eastern half of the Trans-Mexican volcanic belt.

Iztaccíhuatl is the third highest mountain in Mexico, after Popocatépetl. It has four peaks, the highest of which is 5,230 m (17,159 ft) above sea level. Together, the peaks are seen as depicting the head, chest, knees and feet of a sleeping female figure, which is visible from either the east or the west. Iztaccíhuatl is a mere 70 km (44 mi) to the southeast of Mexico City and is often visible from the capital, depending on atmospheric conditions.

Mount Tlaloc (Spanish: Cerro Tláloc or El Mirador, Nahuatl: Tlalocatepetl) is a mountain in central Mexico, located east of Mexico City. Its height is 13,615 ft. (4,151 metres).

La Malinche mountain, also known as Matlalcuéyetl, Matlalcueitl or Malintzin, is an inactive volcano (dormant for the last 3,100 years) located in Tlaxcala and Puebla states, in Mexico. Officially, its summit reaches 4,461 meters (14646 ft) above sea level, though in some articles it is considered to be 4,503 m (as measured by GPS). Its height makes it the sixth highest peak in Mexico.

Nevado de Toluca is a large stratovolcano in central Mexico, located about 80 kilometres (50 mi) west of Mexico City near the city of Toluca. It is generally cited as the fourth highest of Mexico’s peaks, after Iztaccíhuatl, although by some measurements, Sierra Negra is slightly higher. It is often called by the Nahuatl name Xinantécatl.

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