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Environmental Issues Facing Absheron Peninsula, Azerbaijan

40.4N 49.8E

February 8th, 2013 Category: Climate Change

Caspian Sea – January 24th, 2013

The Absheron Peninsula is a peninsula in Azerbaijan that extends 37 miles (60 km) eastward into the Caspian Sea, and reaches a maximum width of 19 miles (30 km). Though technically the easternmost extension of the Caucasus Mountains, the landscape is only mildly hilly, a gently undulating plain that ends in a long spit of sand dunes known as Shah Dili, and now declared the Absheron National Park. In this part the peninsula is dissected by ravines and characterized by frequent salt lakes.

The peninsula is also host to Baku, the biggest and the most populous city of the country, and also the Baku metropolitan area, with its satellite cities Sumgayit and Khyrdalan. As approx. 40% of the country’s population and 70% of the industrial potential of the country is concentrated in the Absheron peninsula, most of the ecological problems in urgent need of solution exist in this area.

One of the primary problems of the Absheron peninsula is related to the contamination of land, mainly with oil and layer waters during oil-gas extraction and drilling works, formation of artificial lakes and pons due to failure to control layer waters, and accumulation of wastes in these territories formed during oil refining process.

Another ecological problem is connected with the situation of sewage systems, with much being discharged into the Sea and internal water basins without being purified. Along with the waste waters oil products, suspension substances, sulphate compounds, chloride salts, superficially active substances, fenol and different other heavy metals are also discharged into water basins (click here for more information).

Clouds Over Caspian Sea

40.5N 51.3E

April 8th, 2012 Category: Clouds, Lakes, Mountains

Caspian Sea - April 6th, 2012

Clouds hang over the Caspian Sea, but not spreading over the land by the shoreline. Through spaces in the cloud cover, sediments can be observed in the southern part of the sea, near the Alborz Mountains, in Iran, and along the coast of the Absheron Peninsula, in Azerbaijan, stretching into the sea from the west coast. Also uncovered by clouds is Karabogas Bay, in Turkmenistan, the lighter blue, shallow bay on the east coast.

Sediments in Various Parts of the Caspian Sea – March 31st, 2011

42.0N 50.0E

March 31st, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Caspian Sea - March 27th, 2011

Colored sediments are visible in various sections of the Caspian Sea. Those from the Volga River give the northern part of the large lake a green appearance. Greenish tan sediments can also be observed near the Absheron Peninsula on the west coast, while those along the southeast coast have a more bluish tone.

Sediments and algae give Karabogas Bay, on the central east coast, a distinct greyish teal color. Other bodies of water are also visible nearby, including the Aral Sea (upper right corner) and Sarygamysh Lake (between the bay and the Aral Sea).

Mountains and Lakes Near Caspian Sea’s Absheron Peninsula – September 30th, 2010

40.4N 49.0E

September 30th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers, Salt Flats

Caspian Sea - August 29th, 2010

The Absheron peninsula in Azerbaijan juts out into the Caspian Sea on the right side of this image. It extends 37 miles (60 km) eastward into the sea, and reaches a maximum width of 19 miles (30 km).

Though technically the easternmost extension of the Caucasus Mountains, whose white peaks are visible running diagonally across the image towards the peninsula, its landscape is only mildly hilly. Most of the peninsula is a gently undulating plain that ends in a long spit of sand dunes known as Shah Dili, and now declared the Absheron National Park. In this part the peninsula is dissected by ravines and characterized by frequent salt lakes.

Two large lakes can be observed in west of the peninsula and south of the mountains: the Mingachevir Reservoir in Azerbaijan, greenish blue, and Lake Sevan in Armenia, dark blue and closer to the left edge. Also visible in the bottom left corner (completely visible in the full image) is Lake Urmia, in Iran, whose shores are ringed by white salt flats.

Absheron Peninsula and Baku, Azerbaijan – December 7th, 2008

December 7th, 2008 Category: Image of the day

Baku, Azerbaijan and Caspian Sea - November 24th, 2008

Absheron Peninsula and Baku, Azerbaijan and Caspian Sea - November 24th, 2008

In this image, phytoplankton swirl in the waters of the Caspian Sea, around the Absheron Peninsula in Azerbaijan.

The Absheron peninsula is a prominent geographical feature of Azerbaijan. It extends 37 miles (60 km) eastward into the Caspian Sea and reaches a maximum width of 19 miles (30 km).

Though technically the easternmost extension of the Caucasus Mountains, visible in the upper left quadrant, the peninsula’s landscape is only mildly hilly, a gently undulating plain that ends in a long spit of sand dunes known as Shah Dili, and now declared the Absheron National Park.

In part the peninsula is dissected by ravines and characterized by frequent salt lakes.

Baku, located on the southern shore of the Absheron Peninsula, is the capital, the largest city, and the largest port of Azerbaijan.  As of January 1, 2005 the population was 2,036,000.

The climate of the peninsula is hot and humid in the summer, and cool and wet in the winter. During the winter gale-force winds sweep through on occasion, driven by masses of polar air (strong northern winds Khazri and southern Gilavar are typical here); however, snow is rare at 28 m below sea level, and temperatures on the coast rarely drop to freezing.

source Wikipedia

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