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Hundreds Dead and Missing in Philippines Due to Typhoon Bopha (26W)

12.7N 116.2E

December 10th, 2012 Category: Tropical Storms

Typhoon Bopha (26W) – December 8th, 2012

Enhanced image

Typhoon Bopha (26W) - December 8th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TY 26W

This image shows Typhoon Bopha (TY 26W) as it passed over the Philippines and weakened to a Tropical Depression. On the day this image was captured, nearly 600 fatalities had been confirmed, and hundreds were still missing as the storm made a U-turn and threatened the country’s northwest.

The following day, Bopha weakened into a Low Pressure Area as it passed over the northern part of the Philippines. The tail end of a cold front contributed to the dissipation of the storm. Currently, 548 people are confirmed dead and 827 are missing.

Bopha (26W) Over South China Sea

11.8N 116.2E

December 9th, 2012 Category: Tropical Storms

Typhoon Bopha (26W) – December 8th, 2012

Enhanced image

Typhoon Bopha (26W) - December 8th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TY 26W

Typhoon Bopha (TY 26W) was a tropical cyclone which formed unusually close to the equator.

Bopha is the strongest tropical cyclone to ever hit the southern Philippine island of Mindanao, making landfall as a Category 5 super typhoon with winds of 160 mph (260 km/h).

Bopha is also the second-most southerly Category 5 super typhoon, reaching a minimum latitude of 7.4°N on December 3. Only Typhoon Louise of 1964 came closer to the equator, reaching 7.3°N.

After first hitting Palau, where it destroyed houses,disrupted communications and caused power outages, flooding and uprooted trees, Bopha made landfall late on December 3 over Mindanao, an island that had been devastated by Washi in December 2011. The storm caused widespread destruction on Mindanao, leaving thousands homeless and more than 500 fatalities.

After hitting Davao Oriental and Compostela Valley provinces, Typhoon Bopha crossed the southern Mindanao and central regions, cutting power to two provinces and triggering landslides. More than 170,000 fled to evacuation centres. The typhoon has since moved to the South China Sea west of the Palawan island province; government meteorologists predict the typhoon’s future path could be across Vietnam or southern China.

Bopha (26W) Weakens to Tropical Depression

12.7N 116.9E

December 9th, 2012 Category: Tropical Storms

Typhoon Bopha (26W) – December 7th, 2012

Enhanced image

Typhoon Bopha (26W) - December 8th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TY 26W

Tropical Depression Bopha (TD 26W) located approximately 240 nm north-northwest of Manila, Philippines, has tracked northeastward at 03 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 20 feet.

The system has rapidly dissipated due to strong (40-50 knots) westerly vertical wind shear. It has winds of approximately 35 knots associated with a northeasterly monsoon surge, and winds of 25 knots or less directly
associated with the low level circulation. The system will dissipate within 24 hours.

Typhoon Bopha (26W) Tracking Northeastward

11.6N 116.9E

December 8th, 2012 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Bopha (26W) – December 6th, 2012

Enhanced image

Typhoon Bopha (26W) - December 6th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TY 26W

Typhoon Bopha (TY 26W) is located approximately 270 nautical miles west-northwest of Manila, Philippines. The typhoon has tracked northeastward at 8 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 40 feet.

Typhoon Bopha (26W) Over Palawan Island, Philippines – December 7th, 2012

9.8N 118.7E

December 7th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Bopha (26W) – December 5th, 2012

Enhanced image

Typhoon Bopha (26W) - December 6th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TY 26W

Typhoon Bopha (TY 26W) is located approximately 320 nautical miles west of Manila, Philippines. The system has tracked north-northwestward at 08 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 20 feet.

Also visible in these images is the use of the Chelys Satellite Rapid Response System (SRRS) “borders” feature, which allows users to download images with countries’ outlines superimposed over cloudcover. Although the typhoon obscures the land and sea below it, thanks to this feature, the outline of Palawan Island can be seen directly below the center of the storm (best observed upon opening full image).

Palawan Island is the largest island of the Palawan Province, Philippines. The northern coast of the island is along the South China Sea, while the southern coast forms part of the northern limit of the Sulu Sea. This island has abundant wildlife, jungle mountains, and white sandy beaches.

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