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Damrey (11W) Upgraded to Typhoon Status

29.9N 131.9E

August 1st, 2012 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Damrey – August 1st, 2012

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Tropical Storm Damrey - August 1st, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Tropical Storm Damrey

Typhoon Damrey (11W), located approximately 150 nm south-southeast of Sasebo, Jpan, has tracked westward at 19 knots over the past six hours and has recently been upgraded to typhoon status. Maximum significant wave height is 24 feet.

Twin Typhoons Saola and Damrey – August 1st, 2012

28.0N 129.8E

August 1st, 2012 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoons Saola and Damrey – August 1st, 2012

Twin Typhoons Saola (10W) and Damrey (11W) are churning in the Pacific Ocean, the former nearer the coast of China, the latter nearer the coast of Japan.

Typhoon Saola, the ninth typhoon of the year, has strengthened and is approaching coastal regions in southeastern Fujian, which has started to prepare for possible disasters. Right now Saola is churning over the Philippine Sea and its heavy rains batter Philippine’s northern Luzon Island.

Yesterday, it was reported that Saola was expected to make landfall at eastern China between the cities of Fuzhou and Taizhou Thursday night or Friday, local time, and that the system would gain typhoon strength at landfall with flooding rain, destructive winds and severe coastal flooding. It was also reported that Damrey could reach typhoon strength when it crosses Japan’s northern Ryukyu Islands or southern Kyushu at midweek with heavy rain and damaging winds. Since yesterday, both systems have effectively reached typhoon status.

 

Tropical Storm Damrey (11W) South of Japan – July 31st, 2012

July 31st, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Damrey – July 31st, 2012

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Tropical Storm Damrey - July 31st, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Tropical Storm Damrey

Tropical Storm Damrey (11W), located approximately 440 nm east-southeast of Sasebo, Japan, has tracked westward at 15 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 20 feet.

Originally a cold-core low on July 18, the system became a tropical disturbance southwest of Minamitorishima late on July 26. Early on July 27, the JMA upgraded it to a tropical depression, as it became better organized.

On July 28, the JTWC issued a TCFA on the system, before the JMA upgraded it to a tropical storm and named it Damrey. Late on the same day, the JTWC upgraded Damrey to a tropical depression. On July 29, the JTWC upgraded Damrey to a tropical storm. Late on July 30, the JMA upgraded Damrey to a severe tropical storm, as convection started to warp around the storm’s center of circulation.

Typhoon Muifa (11W) Southwest of Japan

29.7N 126.0E

August 6th, 2011 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Muifa (TY 11W) – August 6th, 2011

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Track of TY 11W - August 6th, 2011 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TY 11W

Typhoon Muifa (TY 11W), is currently located approximately 140 nautical miles west-northwest of Kadena air base, Japan. Upon opening the full image, the location of the typhoon southwest of Japan can be observed.

The system has tracked north-northwestward at 08 knots over the past six hours. Maximum significant wave height is 33 feet

Eye of Typhoon Muifa (11W) – August 4th, 2011

28.5N 128.9E

August 4th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Muifa (TY 11W) - August 1st, 2011

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Late on July 23, an area of low pressure formed to the southeast of Chuuk. The system gradually drifted to the west and on July 25, the JTWC upgraded the low pressure area to a tropical depression. At that time, it was located approximately 505 nautical miles (935 km; 581 mi) to the west of Guam.

At midnight, that day, the JMA started monitoring the system as a tropical depression. Early on July 28, the JTWC upgraded the system into a Tropical Storm. A few hours later, the JMA too upgraded the system to a tropical storm, naming it Muifa (11W).

Soon, the storm moved into the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) and the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) named it Kabayan. The storm gradually drifted north over the next day maintaining strength. On the night of July 29, Muifa was upgraded into a Severe Tropical Storm.

Overnight, the storm strengthened rapidly and was upgraded into a Typhoon the next morning. The storm strengthened so rapidly, and the JTWC reported that the storm’s peak winds were reaching 140 knots (260 km/h; 160 mph) (1-min sustained), as it strengthened into a Category 5 Typhoon.

However, the typhoon couldn’t maintain Category 5 strength for a long time. According to the JTWC, On July 31, the typhoon interacted with an upper level trough and weakened into a Category 4 Typhoon on the SSHS.

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