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Twin Typhoons Saola and Damrey – August 1st, 2012

28.0N 129.8E

August 1st, 2012 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoons Saola and Damrey – August 1st, 2012

Twin Typhoons Saola (10W) and Damrey (11W) are churning in the Pacific Ocean, the former nearer the coast of China, the latter nearer the coast of Japan.

Typhoon Saola, the ninth typhoon of the year, has strengthened and is approaching coastal regions in southeastern Fujian, which has started to prepare for possible disasters. Right now Saola is churning over the Philippine Sea and its heavy rains batter Philippine’s northern Luzon Island.

Yesterday, it was reported that Saola was expected to make landfall at eastern China between the cities of Fuzhou and Taizhou Thursday night or Friday, local time, and that the system would gain typhoon strength at landfall with flooding rain, destructive winds and severe coastal flooding. It was also reported that Damrey could reach typhoon strength when it crosses Japan’s northern Ryukyu Islands or southern Kyushu at midweek with heavy rain and damaging winds. Since yesterday, both systems have effectively reached typhoon status.

 

Typhoon Saola (10W) Churns Southeast of Taipei, Taiwan

20.4N 123.0E

July 31st, 2012 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Saola – July 31st, 2012

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Tropical Storm Saola - July 31st, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Tropical Storm Saola

Typhoon Saola (10W), located approximately 280 nm southeast of Taipei, Taiwan, has tracked northward at 05 knots over the past six hours. TY 10W has recently been upgraded from tropical storm status based on Dvorak estimates from PGTW and KNES of 65 knots. Maximum significant wave height at is 30 feet.

Typhoon Saola (10W) Causes Problems in Philippines – July 30th, 2012

17.9N 119.9E

July 30th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Saola – July 30th, 2012

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Tropical Storm Saola - July 30th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Tropical Storm Saola

On July 22, a tropical disturbance formed east-northeast of Palau. Late on July 26, the JMA upgraded the system to a tropical depression.

On July 27, the JTWC issued a TCFA on the system. Early on July 28, the JTWC upgraded the system to a tropical depression, whilst the JMA upgraded it to a tropical storm and named it Saola. Soon, the PAGASA upgraded the system to a tropical depression and named it Gener. Later that day, the JTWC upgraded Saola to a tropical storm. Early on July 29, the JMA upgraded Saola to a severe tropical storm.

Saola caused widespread rains in the Philippines due to the enhancement of the southwest monsoon. On July 29, domestic and international flights throughout the country were delayed and cancelled. Small fishing boats were advised not to enter the water as gale warnings were issued by PAGASA. Flooding is imminent as different dams are expected to reach critical levels. Three roads in northern Luzon was impassable due to floods and landslides. About sixty families in Rodriguez, Rizal were evacuated due to severe flooding in the area.

 

Typhoon Nock-Ten (10W) Approaching South China Coast

20.9N 111.3E

August 5th, 2011 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Nock-ten (TY 10W) - July 29th, 2011

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These images offer a look at Typhoon  Nock-Ten (10W) on July 29th, as the storm gradually regained strength and approached the south China coast at Qionghai, China. Later that day, the storm strengthened over land and headed north towards Hainan’s provincial capital region Haikou.

Over the next day, the storm drifted to the west and made landfall over Northern Vietnam. The storm weakened rapidly and at midnight that day, the JMA, issuing their final warning on the system, downgrading it into a tropical low.

 

Typhoon Nock-Ten Near Philippines Coast

12.3N 126.7E

July 31st, 2011 Category: Tropical Cyclones

Typhoon Nock-ten (TY 10W) - July 28th, 2011

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Early on July 22, an area of low pressure formed to the east of Philippines. The system gradually drifted west over the next few days and late on July 24, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center Started Monitoring the system as a Tropical Depression.

Early the next day, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) upgraded the area of low pressure into a Tropical Depression. A few hours later, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) started monitoring the system as a Tropical Depression and named it ‘Juaning’.

The system continued to drift westwards and strengthened rapidly, that on midnight, that day, the JMA furhter upgraded the system into a Tropical Storm, naming it Nock-Ten. Early on July 27, the JMA reported that Nock-ten continued to strengthen and upgraded it into a Severe Tropical Storm.

A few hours later, the JTWC reported that Nock-ten rapidly intensified to a category 1 typhoon and made its landfall over northern Aurora (province) and started weakening. Later the same day, the JMA reported that Nock-ten had exited the Luzon island at Candon maintaining severe tropical storm strength.

However, overnight, the storm rapidly weakened and the JMA downgraded it into a minor tropical storm the next day. However, on July 29, the storm gradually regained strength and approached south China coast at Qionghai, China. Later that day, the storm strengthened over land and headed north towards Hainan’s provincial capital region Haikou. Over the next day, the storm drifted to the west and made landfall over Northern Vietnam. The storm weakened rapidly and at midnight that day, the JMA, issuing their final warning on the system, downgraded it into a tropical low.

The provinces of Albay and Camarines were reported to be completely flooded by the rain. Minor damage to rice crops was reported. More heavy rains were expected throughout the day as the system had exited land into the South China Sea and would soon start reintensifying. The number of missing was also pushed up to 31 after 25 crewmembers of a fishing boat were reported missing when their fishing boat was caught in the storm off Masbate.  In Northern Luzon, Nock-ten poured down heavy rainfall becoming widespread flooding in the area. The national roads were impassable and landslides were also reported. About 26 domestic flights were cancelled from July 26 to 27 due to heavy rains and strong winds.

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