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Posts tagged 07L

Tropical Depression Seven (07L) Regenerates into Tropical Storm Helene

19.0N 98.9W

August 18th, 2012 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Depression 07L – August 18th, 2012

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Tropical Depression 07L - August 18th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Tropical Depression 07L

On August 17 at the 5PM NHC advisory, it was confirmed that Tropical Depression Seven (07L) regenerated into Tropical Storm Helene. Tropical Depression Seven formed on August 9 from a tropical wave (click here for previous image of developing system). 

As of 4:30 p.m. CDT (2130 UTC) August 17, Tropical Storm Helene is located within 20 nautical miles of 20.6°N 96.1°W, about 90 mi (140 km) east-southeast of Tuxpan, Mexico, and about 160 mi (260 km) southeast of Tampico, Mexico. Maximum sustained winds are 40 knots (45 mph, 75 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 1004 mbar (hPa; 29.65 InHg), and the system is moving northwest at 6 kt (7 mph, 11 km/h). Tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 35 miles (55 km) from the center of Helene.

Low Pressure System Strengthens into Tropical Depression 07L

11.4N 48.2W

August 10th, 2012 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Depression 07L – August 10th, 2012

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Tropical Depression 07L - August 10th, 2012 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Tropical Depression 07L

Tropical Depression Seven formed on August 9 from a tropical wave (click here for previous image), and is expected to strengthen to tropical storm status within 48 hours.

As of 5 p.m. AST (2100 UTC) August 10, Tropical Depression Seven is located within 30 nautical miles of 13.7°N 51.9°W, about 510 mi (825 km) east of Barbados. Maximum sustained winds are 30 knots (35 mph, 55 km/h), with stronger gusts. Minimum central pressure is 1009 mbar (hPa; 29.80 InHg), and the system is moving west at 21 kt (24 mph, 39 km/h).

Tropical Storm Gert (07L) Moving Away from Bermuda

32.6N 70W

August 16th, 2011 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Gert (07L) - August 15th, 2011

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Track of TS 07L - August 15th, 2011 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 07L

At 5:00 PM AST (2100 UTC) the center of Tropical Storm Gert (07L) was located near latitude 33.2 north, longitude 62.7 west. Gert is moving toward the north-northeast near 14 mph (22 km/h).

Gert has reached its closest distance to Bermuda and is moving away from the island. A turn toward the northeast accompanied by an increase in forward speed is expected to begin by Tuesday morning and continue through Wednesday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 60 mph (95 km/h) with higher gusts. Some fluctuations in intensity will be possible tonight and Tuesday morning. Gradual weakening is forecast to begin by Tuesday night and continue through Wednesday.

Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) from the center, mainly to the north and east of the center. Estimated minimum central pressure is 1002 mb (29.59 inches).

Tropical Storm Earl (07L) Passes Over Nova Scotia, Canada

50.3N 53.2W

September 6th, 2010 Category: Tropical Storms

Tropical Storm Earl (07L) - September 5th, 2010

Track of TS 07L - September 5th, 2010 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 07L

TS 07L by N. American Coast

Some convection associated with Tropical Storm Earl (07L) can be observed here, northeast of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The main image focuses on one large area of convection to the east. The second shows the convection further west, north of Nova Scotia. In the full image, North American Atlantic coastal areas such as Nova Scotia, Canada, and from Massachusetts to North Carolina, USA, can be observed.

On September 2nd, Earl brushed past Cape Hatteras, with conditions being slightly less severe than expected, but still bringing very heavy rain, winds gusting up to hurricane force, and very large waves. Due to strict design requirements of buildings along Cape Hatteras, damage was minimal, with no structural damage reported along the North Carolina coast.

By the following day, the storm had weakened even further to a Category 1 and changed direction to a projected path along the New England coastline. Areas such as the states of New Jersey, Delaware, Pennsylvania, and Southern New York have experienced only minimal impact.

It weakened further to a tropical storm on the 3rd as it passed to the south-southeast of the New England coastline. Again, conditions were much less severe than expected near Cape Cod, with only minor flooding, beach erosion, and winds gusting up to tropical storm force.

The Canadian Maritime Provinces were not so lucky, however, as Earl made landfall twice in Nova Scotia and once in Prince Edward Island (PEI) at hurricane intensity (from strong TS to low Category 1 winds). The city of Halifax and regions of the province, as well as eastern PEI, experienced many uprooted trees and power outages reminiscent of Hurricane Juan in 2003. One death was directly attributable to the storm. Throughout the Caribbean, Hurricane Earl wrought up to $150 million in damage.

Large and Dangerous Hurricane Earl Threatening US Mid-Atlantic Coast – September 2nd, 2010

28.2N 77.1W

September 2nd, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Tropical Cyclones

Hurricane Earl (07L) - September 1st, 2010

Track of TS 07L - September 1st, 2010 © Univ. of Wisconsin

Track of TS 07L

At 8:00 PM EDT (00:00 UTC), the eye of Hurricane Earl (07L) was located near latitude 27.2 North, longitude 73.5 West. Earl is moving toward the north-northwest near 18 mph (30 km/hr).

This motion is expected to continue tonight with a turn to the north on Thursday. On the forecast track, the core of the hurricane will approach the North Carolina coast by late Thursday, and move near or over the Outer Banks of that state by Thursday night.

Maximum sustained winds are near 135 mph (215 km/hr) with higher gusts.E arl is a category four hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. Some fluctuations in intensity are likely tonight and Thursday, but a gradual weakening trend is anticipated thereafter.

Earl is a large hurricane. Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 90 miles (150 km) from the center, and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 200 miles (325 km). The estimated minimum central pressure is 941 mb (27.79 inches).

There are various hazards affecting land. Tropical storm force winds are expected to reach the North Carolina coast within the warning area by Thursday afternoon with hurricane force winds occurring by late Thursday. Tropical storm force winds will likely reach the coast from Virginia northward to New Jersey by late Thursday night or early Friday.

A dangerous storm surge will raise water levels by as much as 3 to 5 feet above ground level within the hurricane warning
area and the lower Chesapeake Bay. Elsewhere within the tropical storm warning area, a storm surge will raise water levels by as much as 1 to 3 feet above ground level. Near the coast, the surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves.

Rainfall accumulations of 2 to 4 inches, with isolated maximum amounts of 6 inches, are expected over portions of eastern North Carolina including the Outer Banks. With regards to surf, large swells from Earl will continue to affect the Bahamas
and the east coast of the United States through Friday. These swells will likely cause dangerous surf conditions and rip currents.