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The Cook Strait, New Zealand

February 24th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Cook Strait, New Zealand - February 16th, 2009

Cook Strait, New Zealand - February 16th, 2009

The Cook Strait lies between the North and South Islands of New Zealand. Twenty kilometres (12 miles) wide at its narrowest point, on its north side stands the city of Wellington; on the south side lie the Marlborough SoundsĀ  and Cloudy Bay.

An algal bloom frames the northeastern coast of the South Island, particularly in Cloudy Bay. Lake Grassmere, southeast of Cloudy Bay and directly south of Clifford Bay, is filled with bright green algae.

The northwestern shoreline of South Island, on the other hand, where the bays, sounds and coves of the Marlborough Sounds are found, is clear of algae along the exterior coast. However, some is present in the interior, in the Kenepuru Sound.

The Kenepuru Sound is one of the largest of the Marlborough Sounds in the South Island. The drowned valley is an arm of Pelorus Sound, it runs for 25 kilometres from the northeast to southwest, joining Pelorus Sound a quarter of the way down the latter’s path to the Cook Strait.

Across the strait, along the North Island shoreline, algae is present only in Palliser Bay, which runs for 40 kilometres along the Cook Strait coast from Turakirae Head at the southern end of the Rimutaka Ranges to Cape Palliser, the North Island’s southernmost point.

North of Palliser Bay, Lake Wairarapa has a dense, bright green algal bloom. To its southwest, Wellington Harbor is algae-free.

source Wikipedia

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