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Georgia, Between the Greater Caucasus Mountains and Pontic Mountains

January 20th, 2009 Category: Snapshots

Georgia, Between the Greater Caucasus Mountains and Pontic Mountains - December 2nd, 2008

Georgia, Between the Greater Caucasus Mountains and Pontic Mountains - December 2nd, 2008

Snow caps the the southern side of the Greater Caucasus Mountain Range (above) and the peaks of the Pontic Mountains (below).  They are separated by the Black Sea and a green valley, including the Kolkhida Lowlands by the shore.

Many rivers can be seen flowing down the mountainside; most are tan in color due to sediments, while one, just north of the Kolkhida Lowlands, is a striking turquoise green.

Part of these ranges is within the borders of the country of Georgia, which also occupies the lowlands between them.

The Caucasus Mountains are in Eurasia between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. They are comprised of two separate mountain systems: the Greater Caucasus Mountain Range and the Lesser Caucasus Mountains.

The Greater Caucasus Range extends from the Caucasian Natural Reserve in the vicinity of Sochi on the northeastern shore of the Black Sea, generally trending east-southeast and reaching nearly to Baku on the Caspian Sea, while the Lesser Caucasus runs parallel to the greater range, at a distance averaging about 100 km (60 mi) south.

The Greater and Lesser Caucasus ranges are connected by the Likhi Range, which separates the Kolkhida Lowlands (close to the shore) from the Kura Depression (Kura Lowland, far right).

The highest peak in the Caucasus range is Mount Elbrus in the Greater Caucasus, which rises to a height of 18,506 feet (5,642 meters) above sea level.

The Pontic Mountains, on the other hand, are a range of mountains in northern Turkey, whose eastern end extends into southeastern Georgia. The range runs roughly east-west, parallel and close to the southern coast of the Black Sea. The highest peak in the range is Kaçkar Dağı, which rises to 3942 meters elevation (12,933 feet).

The part of the mountains that is not snow capped appears dark green, as they are generally covered by dense forests, predominantly of conifers.

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