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Rich Sediments in the Gulf of Khambhat, India

February 1st, 2009 Category: Rivers

Gulf of Khambhat, India - January 27th, 2009

Gulf of Khambhat, India - January 27th, 2009

The Gulf of Khambhat (formerly known as the Gulf of Cambay) is an inlet of the Arabian Sea along the west coast of India, in the state of Gujarat.

It is about 80 miles in length, and divides the Kathiawar Peninsula to the west from the eastern part of Gujarat state on the east.

The Narmada and Tapti rivers empty into the Gulf.

The Gulf is shallow and abounds in shoals and sandbanks including the Mal Bank at the river mouths and the Malacca Banks at the gulf’s entrance to the Arabian Sea.

The Gulf is known for its extreme tides, which vary greatly in height and run into it with amazing speed. At low tide the bottom is left nearly dry for some distance below the town of Khambhat.

Here, the tide appears to be high, and the waters full of sediments from the two rivers. The reddish-brown color of the sediments reflects the color of the soil in the region.

The salt flats of the Rann of Kutch can be seen on the left, west of the Kathiawar Peninsula. The peninsula shares a similar landscape to that east of the gulf; it is not desertlike as is the land to the northwest.

The outflow of sediments is framed by an algal bloom, as is the gulf below the Rann of Kutch.

source Wikipedia

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