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Negro and Amazon Rivers Flowing Across Amazon Rainforest, Brazil

2.8S 62.2W

March 29th, 2013 Category: Rivers

Brazil – March 26th, 2013

Flowing across the upper portion of this image of the Amazon Rainforest is the Rio Negro, a river with dark, almost black-coloured, water (although part of the river to the east appears light here due to sun glint), while the sandy-coloured Amazon River, or Rio Solimões, flows across the lower part of the image. The two rivers converge near Manaus (not visible here), where for 6 km (3.7 mi) their waters run side by side without mixing, due to differences in temperature, speed and water density.

Sun Glint on Rivers Crossing Amazon Rainforest, Brazil

2.4S 66.5W

March 26th, 2013 Category: Rivers

Brazil – March 26th, 2013

The Amazon River and several of its tributaries can be seen flowing across this image, amidst the green vegetation of the Amazon Rainforest in the Brazilian state of Amazonas. The rivers appear silver in color due to sun glint. Despite the lush green of the vegetation visible here, the Amazon Biome is threatened by climate change and deforestation, resulting in the substitution of forests with savanna-like and semiarid vegetation in many areas.

Convergence of Branco and Negro Rivers, Brazil – February 9th, 2013

1.4S 61.6W

February 9th, 2013 Category: Image of the day, Rivers

Brazil – January 23rd, 2013

This image of the Amazon Rainforest, in Brazil, also shows the confluence of the Branco River (right) and Negro River (left), near the border of the states of Amazonas and Roraima. The Rio Branco (meaning White River) is the principal affluent of the Rio Negro (meaning Black River) from the north.The Branco flows nearly south, and finds its way into the Negro through several channels and a chain of lagoons similar to those of the latter river. It is 350 miles (560 km) long.

The Rio Negro, in turn, is the largest left tributary of the Amazon and the largest blackwater river in the world. It flows into the Rio Solimões to form the Amazon River South of Manaus, Brazil. Rio Negro is navigable for 700 kilometres (430 mi) from its mouth in 1 metre of water in the dry season, but it has many sandbanks and minor difficulties. In the wet season, it floods the country far and wide, sometimes to a width of 30 kilometres (19 mi), for long distances, and for 650 kilometres (400 mi) upstream. During this time, from April until October, it is a succession of lagoons, full of long islands and intricate channels.

Rivers Running Through the Amazon Rainforest, Brazil

3.1S 60W

September 29th, 2012 Category: Deforestation, Fires, Rivers

Brazil – September 1st, 2012

Rivers winding their way through Brazil’s Amazon Rainforest appear as tan lines due to the sediments they carry. Visible in the upper part of the image is the Amazon River, the world’s largest river by waterflow. The city of Manaus can be seen near the confluence of the Negro and Solimões (Amazon) Rivers.

Visible cutting diagonally across the lower part of the image is the Madeira River, the Amazon’s biggest tributary, with a length of about 3,250 km (2,020 mi). Some haze can be seen in the lower right quadrant, mostly south of the river. This is caused by smoke from fires, one of which is visible in the full image. As the fire is located near an area of deforestation, it may have been set in order to clear land for grazing, planting crops or human habitation.

From the Northern Coast of South America to the Meeting of the Waters, Brazil

3.1S 60W

September 26th, 2011 Category: Rivers

Brazil - August 16th, 2011

This image stretches from the northenern coastline of South America, including Guyana, Suriname and French Guiana, across the Brazilian state of Roraima to the state of Amazonas.

Visible near the lower edge is the Amazon River. In the lower left corner, near the city of Manaus, the Meeting of Waters (Portuguese: Encontro das Águas) can be observed. It is the confluence between the Rio Negro, a river with dark (almost black coloured) water, and the sandy-coloured Amazon River or Rio Solimões, as it is known the upper section of the Amazon in Brazil. For 6 km (3.7 mi) the river’s waters run side by side without mixing. It is one of the main tourist attractions of Manaus, Brazil.

This phenomenon is due to the differences in temperature, speed and water density of the two rivers. The Rio Negro flows at near 2 km per hour at a temperature of 28°C, while the Rio Solimões flows between 4 to 6 km per hour a temperature of 22°C.

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