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Islands of Indonesia from Java to Lombok

8.4S 116.4E

February 15th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Indonesia - February 9th, 2012

This orthorectified wide-swath ASAR image shows several islands in Indonesia: (from left to right) Java (mainly East Java), Bali and Lombok. Also visible at the top are Madura (left) and Saubi (right).

East Java is a province of Indonesia. It is located on the eastern part of the island of Java and includes neighboring Madura and islands to its east (the Kangean and Sapudi groups) and to its north (Bawean and the Masalembu Islands). The provincial capital is Surabaya, the second largest city in Indonesia and a major industrial center and port.

Many volcanic peaks can be seen on the islands. One of the most prominent is Mount Rinjani, on Lombok, visible near the right edge. This active volcano on Lombok rises to 3726 m, making it the second highest volcano in Indonesia. On the top of the volcano is a 6 km by 8.5 km caldera, partially filled by Segara Anak (Child of the Sea) lake. This lake is approximately 2000 metres above sea level and estimated at 200 metres deep.

Vegetation Index of Western New Guinea, Indonesia

3.8S 136.4E

January 24th, 2012 Category: Vegetation Index

New Guinea - January 12th, 2012

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of the island of Western New Guinea, the western half of the island of New Guinea that belongs to Indonesia. A central east-west mountain range dominates the geography of New Guinea, over 1,600 km (1,000 mi) in total length. Here, the vegetation index is lowest (yellow) by the peaks of this range.

Another major habitat feature is the vast southern and northern lowlands. Stretching for hundreds of kilometres, these include lowland rainforests, extensive wetlands, savanna grasslands, and some of the largest expanses of mangrove forest in the world. Here, the vegetation index is highest to the west (rusty red) and mostly good (green) on the right side of the image, in those southern and northern lowlands.

Jakarta and Mount Gede Volcano, Indonesia

6.2S 106.8E

January 19th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Indonesia - January 4th, 2012

In the upper right corner of this APM image is Jakarta, the capital and largest city of Indonesia. It is located on the northwest coast of Java, at the mouth of the Ciliwung River on Jakarta Bay, which is an inlet of the Java Sea. The city has an area of 661 square kilometres (255 sq mi).

Jakarta lies in a low, flat basin, averaging 7 metres (23 ft) above sea level; 40% of Jakarta, particularly the northern areas, is below sea level, while the southern parts are comparatively hilly. Rivers flow from the Puncak highlands to the south of the city, across the city northwards towards the Java Sea; the most important is the Ciliwung River, which divides the city into the western and eastern principalities. Other rivers include the Pesanggrahan, and Sunter.

Visible to the south, near the right edge, in the full image, is Mount Gede or Gunung Gede, a stratovolcano in West Java, Indonesia. The volcano contains two peaks: Mount Gede and Mount Pangrango. Seven craters are located in the complex: Baru, Gumuruh (2,927 m), Lanang (2,800 m), Kawah Leutik, Ratu (2,800 m), Sela (2,709 m) and Wadon (2,600 m). Historical volcanic activity has been recorded since the 16th century.

Vegetation Index of Malaysia and Sumatra, Indonesia

1.2N 102.8E

January 18th, 2012 Category: Vegetation Index

Malaysia and Indonesia - January 3rd, 2012

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of Sumatra (below), an island in western Indonesia, westernmost of the Sunda Islands, and of southern Malaysia (above). The two are separated by the Strait of Malacca. The vegetation index ranges from good (green) to high (rusty red), although it is generally higher along the coastlines of the two countries.

The longest axis of Sumatra runs approximately 1,790 km (1,110 mi) northwest–southeast, crossing the equator near the centre. At its widest point the island spans 435 km (270 mi). The interior of the island is dominated by two geographical regions: the Barisan Mountains in the west and swampy plains in the east.

Volcanoes on Indonesian Island Chain

8.6S 116.3E

January 4th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Indonesia - December 22nd, 2011

This orthorectified wide-swath ASAR image shows several islands in Indonesia: (from left to right) Java, Bali, Lombok and Sumbawa. Also visible at the top are Madura (left) and Saubi (center).

Many volcanic peaks can be seen on the islands. One of the most prominent is Mount Rinjani, on Lombok. This active volcano on Lombok rises to 3726 m, making it the second highest volcano in Indonesia. On the top of the volcano is a 6 km by 8.5 km caldera, partially filled by Segara Anak (Child of the Sea) lake. This lake is approximately 2000 metres above sea level and estimated at 200 metres deep.