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Search Results for ""Mount Etna"":

Mount Etna Erupts for Third Time in 2012, Italy – March 5th, 2012

37.7N 14.9E

March 5th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Mount Etna - March 4th, 2012

Visible by the left edge of this image is Mount Etna, in Sicily, Italy. A white cloud of ash and steam can be seen spewing forth from the volcano, which is already erupting for the third time in 2012. Mount Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and is in an almost constant state of activity.

Mount Etna is an active stratovolcano on the east coast of Sicily, close to Messina and Catania. It is the tallest active volcano in Europe, currently standing 3,329 m (10,922 ft) high, though this varies with summit eruptions; the mountain is 21 m (69 ft) higher than it was in 1981. Etna covers an area of 1,190 km² (460 sq mi) with a basal circumference of 140 km, making it by far the largest of the three active volcanoes in Italy.

Volcanic Peaks of Mount Etna and Aeolian Islands, Italy

37.7N 14.9E

February 4th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Italy - February 2nd, 2012

The island of Sicily (left) and southern Italy (right) are separated by the Strait of Messina, which connects the Tyrrhenian Sea with the Ionian Sea, within the central Mediterranean.Visible near the eastern coast of Sicily is Mount Etna, and visible off the northern coast are the Aeolian Islands.

Mount Etna is an active stratovolcano on the east coast of Sicily, close to Messina and Catania. It is the tallest active volcano in Europe, currently standing 3,329 m (10,922 ft) high, though this varies with summit eruptions. It also is the highest mountain in Italy south of the Alps. Etna covers an area of 1,190 km² (460 sq mi) with a basal circumference of 140 km. Mount Etna is one of the most active volcanoes in the world and is in an almost constant state of activity.

The Aeolian Islands or Lipari Islands (Italian: Isole Eolie) are a volcanic archipelago in the Tyrrhenian Sea north of Sicily. Scientifically the archipelago is defined as a “volcanic arc”. There are two active volcanoes – Stromboli and Vulcano. The volcanic activity of steaming fumaroles and thermal waters are on most of the islands.

Ash Plume from Mount Etna, Italy – October 16th, 2011

37.7N 14.9E

October 16th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Italy - October 13th, 2011

A plume of ash can be seen spewing from Mount Etna and blowing towards the southeast. Mount Etna is an active stratovolcano on the east coast of Sicily, close to Messina and Catania.

It is the tallest active volcano in Europe, currently standing 3,329 metres (10,922 ft) high, though this varies with summit eruptions; the mountain is 21 m (69 ft) higher than it was in 1981. It is the highest mountain in Italy south of the Alps. Etna covers an area of 1,190 km² (460 sq mi) with a basal circumference of 140 km. This makes it by far the largest of the three active volcanoes in Italy.

Ash Plume from Mount Etna – August 21st, 2011

37.7N 14.9E

August 21st, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Italy - August 13th, 2011

Mount Etna, a volcano on the Italian island of Sicily, has being having short, violent bursts of activity known as paroxysms throughout the year. Each paroxysm has included volcanic tremors, emissions of ash and lava flows, all concentrated around the New Southeast Crater, which is located just below the volcano’s summit.

Etna’s tenth paroxysm of 2011 occurred on August 12th, as reported by NASA. This image shows the volcano the day after the event, still releasing a white plume of gas and ash to the southeast, towards the nearby city of Catania. Like the other events, the activity began at the New Southeast Crater. This time, fountaining of lava produced the ash plume, which was estimated to have reached an altitude of 14,000 feet (4,300 meters); 2,000 feet (600 meters) above the 10,925-foot (3,330-meter) summit.

Snowfall Covering Summit of Mount Etna, Italy – March 8th, 2011

37.7N 14.9E

March 8th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Italy - February 11th, 2011

The summit of Mount Etna, on the Italian island of Sicily, is covered with snow in this winter image. The sides of the famous stratovolcano are lacking in vegetation and thus appear dark greyish grown.

During the year 2010, the summit craters of Etna were the site of intermittent, minor explosive activity, which produced only minor quantities of ash and no lava flows. The vent on the east side of the Southeast Crater cone became again active in late December; activity then intensified in early January 2011.

Click here for a look at the volcano’s activity in early December 2010, and here for its activity in mid-December.