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Search Results for "balqash":

Taklamakan Desert and Lakes Balqash and Issyk Kul in Asia – November 24th, 2010

42.6N 77.8E

November 24th, 2010 Category: Deserts, Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

China, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan - November 9th, 2010

The Taklamakan Desert in China occupies most of the lower half of this image. In the full version, many rows of towering sand dunes can be observed. Cutting vertically across the otherwise arid desert is the Khotan River.

The Khotan River is formed by the confluence of the White Jade (Yurungkash) and Black Jade (Karakash) Rivers. Their convergence can be observed by the southwestern part of the desert.

Several lakes can also be seen to the north. The largest two are Lake Issyk Kul, in Kyrgyzstan, and Lake Balqash, in southeastern Kazakhstan. The former is dark blue and surrounded by the Tian Shan Mountains. The latter is larger and lighter blue in color, particularly to the west where tan sediments mix with the waters.

Ili River Entering Lake Balqash, Kazakhstan – October 10th, 2010

46.2N 74.3E

October 10th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Kazakhstan - August 29th, 2010

The waters of Lake Balqash, in southeastern Kazakhstan, appear bright blue in this late summer image. Green sediments are present in the southearn reaches of the lake, while the northeastern part appears slightly darker in color.

The green sediments or algae are entering the lake from the Ili River, on its southeastern shores. The land around the riverbanks shows green vegetation, in constrast to the surrounding tan, arid landscape. Due to the influx of fresh water from the river, the western end of the lake is fresh while the eastern end is salty.

Lakes Balqash, Sasykkol and Alakol in Southeastern Kazakhstan

46.2N 74.3E

August 19th, 2010 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Kazakhstan - July 30th, 2010

The large, curved lake in the lower half of this image is Lake Balqash, in southeastern Kazakhstan. Two other bodies of water, Lakes Sasykkol (bright green) and Alakol (blue), can be seen to the east of the eastern tip of the former.

The waters of Lake Balqash gradually change in color from whitish tan, to the west, to bright blue, to the east. This is due to the influx of sediments from the Ili River. The land around the river, by the western end of the lake, is covered in vegetation and dark green.

Lake Balqash, the Qapshaghay Bogeni Reservoir and Lake Issyk Kul

46.2N 74.3E

November 17th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Kazakhstan - October 5th, 2009

Kazakhstan - October 5th, 2009

Lake Balqash (center) and the smaller Qapshaghay Bogeni Reservoir, both in southeastern Kazakhstan, and the deep Lake Issyk Kul, in Kyrgyzstan, show varying shades of blue waters.

The waters of Lake Balqash appear turquoise to the east and a slightly lighter blue with a tan tint to the west. This difference could be from sediments draining into the lake from the Ili River (visible at the western end of the lake along the eastern shores), from differences in depth, or from differences in salinity, as the eastern half of the lake is salty while its western half is fresh.

Further south, the Qapshaghay Bogeni Reservoir also has a turquoise color. The Tian Shan Mountains to its south, crested with snow, mark the border between Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. South of the first ridge is Lake Issyk Kul , which is deeper and darker blue than its neighbors.

Rivers Draining into Lake Balqash, Kazakhstan – September 11th, 2009

46.5N 75.0E

September 11th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

Kazakhstan - August 31st, 2009

Kazakhstan - August 31st, 2009

Eastern end

Eastern end

Western end

Western end

The waters of Lake Balqash, in southeastern Kazakhstan, appear bright turquoise. It is the second largest lake in Central Asia after the Aral Sea, and it is part of the same endorheic basin as the Caspian and Aral seas.

The two close-ups focus on the eastern and western ends of the lake. The western half of the lake is fresh water, while the eastern half is saline. The eastern half is also almost twice as deep.

The close-up of the western end also shows the Ili River, the chief river of the seven that drain into Lake Balqash. The Ili is fed from precipitation (largely vernal snowmelt) from the mountains of China’s Xinjiang region. It is 1,439 km (894 mi) long, 815 km (506 mi) of which are in Kazakhstan. Flowing into Lake Balqash it forms a large delta with vast wetland regions of lakes, marshes and jungle-like vegetation.

The close-up of the eastern end, on the other hand, shows (from left to right) the Karatal, Aksu and Lepsi Rivers draining into Lake Balqash. The Karatal is the second-largest of the rivers that empty into the lake. It rises in the Dzungarian Alatau Mountains near the border of Kazakhstan and China.