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Salt Flats, Mountains and Gulfs Near Adelaide, Australia – November 30th, 2010

34.9S 138.6E

November 30th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Mountains, Salt Flats, Sediments

Australia - November 9th, 2010

Sediments are present into the Spencer Gulf (west) and Gulf St. Vincent (east), the two of which are separated by the Yorke Peninsula. The city of Adelaide is located by the shores of Gulf St. Vincent.

Moving inland from the apex of Spencer Gulf, the Flinders Ranges appear as a dark brown area. In the full image, the almost swirled shape of the individual ridges can be observed. The ranges lie between Lake Torrens (west) and Lake Frome (east). Both are usually dry salt flats, hence the whitish grey color.

The Yorke Peninsula Near Adelaide, Australia, and Nearby Lakes

35S 137.2E

April 14th, 2010 Category: Lakes

Australia - March 5th, 2010

Australia - March 5th, 2010

The Yorke Peninsula is a peninsula located north-west and west of Adelaide in South Australia, Australia, between Spencer Gulf on the west and Gulf St Vincent on the east. The peninsula is separated from Kangaroo Island to the southeast by Investigator Strait.

Principal towns include the Copper Triangle towns of Kadina, Moonta and Wallaroo; farming centres of Maitland, Minlaton and Yorketown; and the port of Ardrossan. A number of smaller coastal towns are popular destinations for fishing and holidays, particularly from Adelaide. The south-western tip is occupied by Innes National Park.d

Two lakes can also be seen near the peninsula: the green lake east of Kangaroo Island, near the shoreline, is Lake Alexandrina, and the bright white patch in the upper left quadrant is the saline, endorheic Lake Gairdner.

Lake Alexandrina and Adelaide, Australia – March 24th, 2009

March 24th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Lake Alexandrina and Adelaide, Australia - March 20th, 2009

Lake Alexandrina and Adelaide, Australia - March 20th, 2009

Lake Alexandrina is a lake in the state of South Australia, Australia, adjacent to the coast of the Southern Ocean, about 100 kilometres south-east of Adelaide (visible as a light grey area on the coast). Easily identifiable from its bright green color, the lake is north of Encounter Bay and east of Fleurieu Peninsula.

The major river flowing into Lake Alexandrina is the Murray River; others include the Bremer, Angas, and Finniss Rivers, all from the eastern side of the southern Mount Lofty Ranges. A narrow channel connects Lake Alexandrina to the smaller Lake Albert to the south-east.

Lake Alexandrina, which is shallow and contains a number of islands near the southern end, empties into the sea near Goolwa (the channel is known as the Murray Mouth). However, when the river flow is low the entrance is often blocked by a sand-bar.

Originally subjected to tidal and storm inflows of seawater the lake is now maintained as fresh water by a series of barrages across the islands near the Murray Mouth. This has produced an annual requirement for more than 1 million megalitres of fresh water to replace losses from evaporation that once came from sea water.

Sediments in Van Diemen Gulf Near Melville Island, Australia

11.5S 131.1E

January 12th, 2012 Category: Lakes, Sediments

Australia - January 12th, 2012

Sediments can be observed in Northern Australia in Van Diemen Gulf, between Arnhem Land, of the attached Cobourg Peninsula, and Melville Island. The gulf is connected to the Timor Sea in the west by the Clarence Strait and to the Arafura Sea in the north by Dundas Strait (between Melville Island and Cobourg Peninsula). The sediments are carried into the gulf by rivers including the South Alligator River, the East Alligator River and the Adelaide River.

Melville Island or Yermalner Island lies in the eastern Timor Sea, off the coast of the Northern Territory of Australia. It is west of the Cobourg Peninsula in Arnhem Land. At 5786 km2 it is just outside the 100 largest islands in the world, but is the second biggest island in Australia, after Tasmania (and excluding the continental landmass).

Visible by the bottom edge is the Lakes Argyle and Kununurra Ramsar Site, which comprises an extensive system of artificial freshwater reservoirs, with their associated permanent wetlands, formed by damming the Ord River in the eastern part of the Kimberley Region of northern Western Australia.

Flinders Ranges: South Australia’s Largest Mountains

31.4S 138.7E

June 25th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Snapshots

Australia - June 23rd, 2009

Australia - June 23rd, 2009

This swirled, almost paisley, brown design over Australia’s red terrain is actually a series of mountains known as the Flinders Ranges.

They are South Australia’s largest mountain range, situated approximately 400 km north of Adelaide. The discontinuous ranges stretch for over 430 km from Port Pirie to Lake Callabonna.

The interesting pattern visible from space was caused by sediments deposited in a large basin that the folded and faulted over time, creating the ranges. Today, these ranges are relatively low, due to erosion.

Two salt lakes, which are usually dry salt pans, are also visible near the ranges: Lake Torrens, to the west, and Lake Frome, to the east.

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