Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Search Results for "tibesti":

Lava Flow by Toussidé Volcano in Tibesti Mountains, Libya and Chad – June 16th, 2012

21.0N 16.4E

June 16th, 2012 Category: Deserts, Image of the day, Mountains, Volcanoes

Libya and Chad - January 4th, 2012

Creating a brown contrast against the yellow sands of the Sahara Desert are the Tibesti Mountains, a range of inactive volcanoes located on the northern edge of the Chad Basin in the Borkou- and Tibesti Region of northern Chad. The northern slopes extend into southern Libya. The massif is one of the most prominent features of the Central Sahara desert and covers an area of approximately 100,000 km2 (39,000 sq mi). The dark brown area visible within the mountain range is a lava flow around the Toussidé Volcano.

Aïr Mountains, Niger, and Tibesti Mountains, Chad – January 10th, 2012

18.8N 12.4E

January 10th, 2012 Category: Deserts, Image of the day, Lakes, Mountains

Niger - January 9th, 2012

Visible amidst the Sahara Desert sands in Africa are two important mountain ranges: the Aïr Mountains (left) and the Tibesti Mountains (upper right), as well as Lake Chad (lower right). Lake Chad is a historically large, shallow, endorheic lake that provides water to more than 20 million people living in the four countries that surround it (Chad, Cameroon, Niger, and Nigeria) on the edge of the Sahara Desert.

The Aïr Mountains (also known as the Aïr Massif or Air of Niger) is a triangular massif, located in northern Niger, within the Sahara desert. Part of the West Saharan montane xeric woodlands ecoregion, they rise to more than 6,000 ft (1 830 m) and extend over 84 000 km².

The Tibesti Mountains are a range of inactive volcanoes located on the northern edge of the Chad Basin in the Borkou- and Tibesti Region of northern Chad. The massif is one of the most prominent features of the Central-Sahara desert and covers an area of approximately 100,000 km². The northern slopes extend into southern Libya.

 

Volcanoes and Lava Flows of the Tibesti Mountains, Chad and Libya – November 26th, 2010

21.3N 16.3E

November 26th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Mountains, Volcanoes

Chad and Libya - November 9th, 2010

The Tibesti Mountains appear as a large brown area occupying most of this image of northern Chad and part of southern Libya. They are a group of dormant volcanoes forming a mountain range in the central Sahara desert, visible as the tan area to the north and west.

In the center of the mountains, in Chad, is Tarso Voon, a stratovolcano with a summit caldera that is 14 x 18 km large. Ignimbrite deposits surround the caldera to distances of 15–35 km.

The dark brown area to the west is Toussidé (also known as Tarso Toussidé), a potentially active volcano that rises to an elevation of 3265 m above sea level. The octopus-like brown shape is due to lava flows extending down the western flank.

Finally, to the north of Toussidé is Tarso Toh, a volcanic field that fills valleys and plains over an area of 80 km in east-west direction and 20–30 km in north-south direction. It contains 150 scoria cones and two maars.

Tibesti Mountain Volcanoes, Chad – October 31st, 2008

October 31st, 2008 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Emi Koussi volcano, Chad

Emi Koussi volcano, Chad

Close-up of craters 1

Close-up of craters 1

Here we have a sharp image of the Tibesti Mountains, a group of dormant volcanoes forming a mountain range in the central Sahara desert in the Bourkou-Ennedi-Tibesti Region of northern Chad.

The mountains are the largest and highest range in the Sahara.

The highest peak is Emi Koussi, 3,415 m, visible in the third close-up.

Other summits include Kegueur Terbi (3,376 m), Tarso Taro (3,325 m), in the first close-up, and Soborom (3,100 m).

Close-up of craters 2

Close-up of craters 2

The active volcano Pic Toussidé (3,265 m), with tentacle-like lava flows running down its sides, is best observed in the second close-up.

While the high peaks themselves are all constituted of volcanic material, the mountains stand on broad uplifted area possibly caused by a mantle plume.

The range has a substantially wetter climate than the arid surrounding desert; annual rainfall is estimated at five inches (12 cm) in some of the highest areas of the mountains.

Close-up of craters 3

Close-up of craters 3

source Wikipedia

Sahara Desert Bordered by Mountains and Lakes in Libya, Chad and Niger – November 15th, 2010

22.9N 14.7E

November 15th, 2010 Category: Deserts, Image of the day, Lakes, Mosaics

Libya, Chad and Niger - October 27th, 2010

While the center part of this image is covered in yellow Sahara Desert sands, several other interesting geographical features can be observed by the edges.

The dark brown area in the upper right corner is the Tibesti Mountains, a group of mostly inactive volcanoes in northern Chad and extending a short distance into southern Libya.

Lighter brown in color and showing more circular patterns at the center left edge are the Aïr Mountains, in northern Niger, within the Sahara desert. The part of the Sahara east of the massifs is also known as the Ténéré Desert.

The green area by the bottom edge is Lake Chad, a shallow but large lake surrounded by wetlands in central Chad, on the edge of the Sahara Desert. In the full image, the yellow sands of the Sahara can be seen giving way to less arid lands to the south.

Finally, visible only at the top of the full image, is the Haruj volcanic field in central Libya. This large field contains many volcanoes, craters and lava flows.