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Early Summer Melting Affecting Fuchs Ice Piedmont, Adelaide Island, Antarctica – January 7th, 2013

67.1S 68.1W

January 7th, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Glaciers and Ice Caps, Image of the day

Antarctica – January 6th, 2013

Small icebergs can be seen breaking off the coast of Antarctica, near Adelaide Island (upper right quadrant). Adelaide Island, also known as  Isla Adelaida and Isla Belgrano, is a large, mainly ice-covered island, 75 miles (121 km) long and 20 miles (32 km) wide, lying at the north side of Marguerite Bay off the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. The Ginger Islands lie off the southern end.

Located on Adelaide Island is the Fuchs Ice Piedmont, an ice piedmont (ice covering a coastal strip of low-lying land backed by mountains) that is 70 nautical miles (130 km) long, extending in a northeast–southwest direction along the entire west coast of the island. According to Chilean scientists, the snow-covered surface of the glacier has progressively deteriorated over the years, due to increasingly early summer melting. Crevasses appear on the glacier surface progressively earlier in the summer, presumably due to higher snowmelt and perhaps higher ice velocities, in response to regional atmospheric warming.

Salt Flats, Mountains and Gulfs Near Adelaide, Australia – November 30th, 2010

34.9S 138.6E

November 30th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Mountains, Salt Flats, Sediments

Australia - November 9th, 2010

Sediments are present into the Spencer Gulf (west) and Gulf St. Vincent (east), the two of which are separated by the Yorke Peninsula. The city of Adelaide is located by the shores of Gulf St. Vincent.

Moving inland from the apex of Spencer Gulf, the Flinders Ranges appear as a dark brown area. In the full image, the almost swirled shape of the individual ridges can be observed. The ranges lie between Lake Torrens (west) and Lake Frome (east). Both are usually dry salt flats, hence the whitish grey color.

Lake Alexandrina and Adelaide, Australia – March 24th, 2009

March 24th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Lake Alexandrina and Adelaide, Australia - March 20th, 2009

Lake Alexandrina and Adelaide, Australia - March 20th, 2009

Lake Alexandrina is a lake in the state of South Australia, Australia, adjacent to the coast of the Southern Ocean, about 100 kilometres south-east of Adelaide (visible as a light grey area on the coast). Easily identifiable from its bright green color, the lake is north of Encounter Bay and east of Fleurieu Peninsula.

The major river flowing into Lake Alexandrina is the Murray River; others include the Bremer, Angas, and Finniss Rivers, all from the eastern side of the southern Mount Lofty Ranges. A narrow channel connects Lake Alexandrina to the smaller Lake Albert to the south-east.

Lake Alexandrina, which is shallow and contains a number of islands near the southern end, empties into the sea near Goolwa (the channel is known as the Murray Mouth). However, when the river flow is low the entrance is often blocked by a sand-bar.

Originally subjected to tidal and storm inflows of seawater the lake is now maintained as fresh water by a series of barrages across the islands near the Murray Mouth. This has produced an annual requirement for more than 1 million megalitres of fresh water to replace losses from evaporation that once came from sea water.

Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcano Active Again – February 10th, 2012

40.6S 72.5W

February 10th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Chile and Argentina - February 6th, 2012

Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano releases ash and steam once again in early February. Here, the ash plume can be seen blowing to the east-northeast, over Argentina. Misleadingly called by media the Puyehue eruption, the eruption is actually from the Cordon Caulle fissure.

The eruption began over eight months ago, in the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic complex, on June 4, 2011, although increased seismic activity had been reported even earlier, on April 27, 2011. The ash cloud from the first period of eruptions was blown across cities all around the Southern hemisphere, including Bariloche, Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Stanley, Porto Alegre, Cape Town, Hobart, Perth, Adelaide, Sydney, Melbourne, Wellington and Auckland, forcing airlines to cancel hundreds of international and domestic flights and causing travel chaos.

Sediments in Joseph Bonaparte and Van Diemen Gulfs, Australia – July 14th, 2011

13.3S 129.3E

July 14th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Sediments

Australia - July 13th, 2011

Sediments frame the coastline of northwestern Australia. They are most dense in the Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, a large body of water off the coast of the Northern Territory, Australia and Western Australia. The Ord River and Victoria River drain into the gulf, giving it its dark tan color.

Moving northeastward up the coast, one comes to the Van Diemen Gulf, a gulf between Arnhem Land, of the attached Cobourg Peninsula and Melville Island in northern Australia. Rivers draining into the Gulf include the South Alligator River, the East Alligator River and the Adelaide River, giving it its greenish color.