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Volcanic Eruption in Chile – January 21st, 2013

40.6S 72.5W

January 21st, 2013 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Chile – January 20th, 2013

A cloud of what appears to be ash from a volcanic eruption blows westward over Chile, towards the Pacific Ocean. The ash appears to be emanating from one of the four different volcanoes that constitute the volcanic group known as the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex: the Cordillera Nevada caldera, the Pliocene Mencheca volcano, Cordón Caulle fissure vents and the Puyehue stratovolcano. However, reports of volcanic activity in Chile indicate that activity is currently limited to the Copahue and Villarrica volcanoes, meaning that the cloud in this image may be the result of other phenomena, such as wildfires.

Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcano Active Again – February 10th, 2012

40.6S 72.5W

February 10th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Chile and Argentina - February 6th, 2012

Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano releases ash and steam once again in early February. Here, the ash plume can be seen blowing to the east-northeast, over Argentina. Misleadingly called by media the Puyehue eruption, the eruption is actually from the Cordon Caulle fissure.

The eruption began over eight months ago, in the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic complex, on June 4, 2011, although increased seismic activity had been reported even earlier, on April 27, 2011. The ash cloud from the first period of eruptions was blown across cities all around the Southern hemisphere, including Bariloche, Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Stanley, Porto Alegre, Cape Town, Hobart, Perth, Adelaide, Sydney, Melbourne, Wellington and Auckland, forcing airlines to cancel hundreds of international and domestic flights and causing travel chaos.

Volcanic Ash and Steam Released from Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Once Again – December 29th, 2011

40.6S 72.5W

December 29th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Argentina and Chile - December 24th, 2011

Volcanic ash and steam pour through a fissure of Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano that opened several months earlier. The active fissure lies northwest of the Puyehue caldera, and a plume blows from the fissure westwards to the coast, then northwestwards over the Pacific Ocean.

Chile’s Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería has characterized the recent activity as a minor eruption of low intensity. Puyehue-Cordón Caulle is a stratovolcano, a steep-sloped, conical volcano composed of layers of ash, lava, and rocks released by previous eruptions. The volcano is 2,236 meters (7,336 feet) high.

Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcano Releases Ash Once Again – October 18th, 2011

40.6S 72.5W

October 18th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Chile and Argentina - October 15th, 2011

Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano acted up again this week releasing a cloud of ash that spread across Chile and over Argentina. In the lower half of this image, a whitish ash cloud can be seen fanning out from the volcano.

In the upper half of the image, some tan-colored ash can be seen hangin over the province of Buenos Aires, between Bahía Blanca and the city of Buenos Aires (upper right corner, appearing as a greyish-tan area on the shores of the brown, sediment-laden Rio de la Plata Estuary).

Ash From Puyehue Volcano Still in Air Off Argentine Coast – August 26th, 2011

46S 66.2W

August 26th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Argentina - August 22nd, 2011

Volcanic ash from the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic eruption in Chile can still be seen hovering in the air off the coast of Argentina, south of Bahía Blanca and Peninsula Valdes, across the San Jorge Gulf, and past Punto Deseado.

Puyehue and Cordón Caulle are two coalesced volcanic vents that form a major mountain massif in Puyehue National Park in the Andes of Ranco Province, Chile. In volcanology this group is known as the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex (PCCVC). Four different volcanoes constitute the volcanic group or complex, the Cordillera Nevada caldera, the Pliocene Mencheca volcano, Cordón Caulle fissure vents and the Puyehue stratovolcano.

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