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Sediments in Lake Michigan by Chicago, USA – November 29th, 2012

41.8N 87.6W

November 29th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Sediments

USA – November 28th, 2012

Lake Michigan is the only one of the Great Lakes wholly within the borders of the United States; the others are shared with Canada. Twelve million people live along its shores, mainly in the Chicago and Milwaukee metropolitan areas. Here, Chicago appears as a grey area on the southwestern shoreline. Sediments line the southern shores and can be seen by Chicago.

Lake Michigan has a surface area of 22,400 square miles (58,000 km2), making it the largest lake entirely within one country by surface area, and the fifth largest lake in the world.

Although only the southern half is visible here, the lake is 307 miles (494 km) long by 118 miles (190 km) wide with a shoreline 1,640 miles (2,640 km) long. The lake’s average depth is 46 fathoms 3 feet (279 ft; 85 m), while its greatest depth is 153 fathoms 5 feet (923 ft; 281 m). It contains a volume of 1,180 cubic miles (4,918 km³) of water.

Ice and Sediments in Lake Michigan, USA – April 21st, 2010

43.4N 87.2W

April 21st, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

USA - March 5th, 2010

USA - March 5th, 2010

Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America, and the only one located entirely within the United States. It is bounded, from west to east, by the U.S. states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan. Although this image focuses on the southern section of the lake, parts of all four states are visible. The city of Chicago is also situated on the southwestern shores.

The beaches of the lake’s western coast and the northernmost part of the east coast are rocky, while the southern and eastern beaches are sandy and dune-covered. This is partly because of the prevailing winds from the west which also cause thick layers of ice to build up on the eastern shore in winter. Here, ice can be observed along the southeastern coastline, while greenish sediments or algae border both the western and eastern shores.

View of Lake Michigan, USA – October 15th, 2008

October 15th, 2008 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Lake Michigan - October 9th, 2008Lake Michigan

Lake Michigan - October 9th, 2008

Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. It is the only Great Lake located completely within the borders of the United States; the others are shared with Canada. It is bounded, from west to east, by the U.S. states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan.
The lake is slightly larger than the country of Croatia. It has a surface area of 22,400 square miles (58,016 km²), making it the largest lake entirely within one country by surface area, and the fifth largest lake in the world. It is 307 miles (494 km) long by 118 miles (190 km) wide with a shoreline 1,640 miles (2,633 km) long. The lake’s average depth is 279 feet (85 m), while its greatest depth is 923 feet (281 m).

In the image we can see Lake Michigan (to the left), as well as Lake Huron (to the right) and a section of Lake Erie (far right). Geologically and hydrologically, Michigan and Huron are the same body of water (sometimes called Lake Michigan-Huron), but are geographically distinct. Counted together, it is the largest fresh water body in the world by surface area. The Mackinac Bridge is generally considered the dividing line between them. The city of Chicage is also visible on the western side of the southern shore of Lake Michigan.

The Milwaukee Reef, running under Lake Michigan from Milwaukee to a point between Grand Haven and Muskegon (both cities in the middle of the eastern lake shore), divides the lake into northern and southern pools. Each pool has a counterclockwise flow of water, deriving from rivers, winds, and the Coriolis effect. Prevailing westerly winds tend to move the surface water toward the east, producing a moderating effect on the climate of western Michigan. There is a mean difference in summer temperatures of 5 to 10 degrees between the Wisconsin and Michigan shores.

source Wikipedia

Urban Sprawl in the Great Lakes Region, USA – May 31st, 2013

42.3N 83W

May 31st, 2013 Category: Image of the day

USA – May 30th, 2013

Urban sprawl can be generally defined as wide-spread, low-density development that consists primarily of strip commercial developments, such as malls and large office buildings, and housing subdivisions connected by new, wide roads and boulevards. The subdivisions are set apart from other development and built within a specific price range, and people are dependant on their cars to get them from one place to another. With sprawl, fewer people occupy more land and as the people spread out, so do the buildings, roads and houses.

The Great Lakes region is losing its rich farmland and other greenfields to urban sprawl at an alarming rate, and the environment and the residents are paying the price. Many cities of the Great Lakes region, such as Chicago (upper left, on the shores of Lake Michigan), Detroit (above, center, on the northwestern shores of Lake Erie) and Cleveland (southeast of Detroit, on the southwestern shores of Lake Erie), are seeing their businesses and residents move to the suburbs, forever destroying open spaces and leaving behind cities of abandoned buildings with fewer tax payers.

With little or no land use planning to protect greenfields, farm fields and rural countrysides and ecologically important habitats such as wetlands have been carved up. More roads were needed to connect the new development to downtown, which invited more development on the outskirts and the cycle continues today. As more people and businesses move out to former greenfields, fewer taxpayers are supporting older towns and cities, leaving them to deteriorate (click here for more information).

Sediments by Southern Shores of Lakes Michigan and Huron – October 25th, 2011

42.8N 87.3W

October 25th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Sediments

USA - October 24th, 2011

Sediments line the southern shorelines of Lakes Michigan (left) and Huron (right), near the USA-Canada border. Lake Michigan is the only one of the Great Lakes wholly within the borders of the United States; the others are shared with Canada.

Lake Michigan has a surface area of 22,400 square miles (58,000 km2) (58,016 km²), making it the largest lake entirely within one country by surface area, and the fifth largest lake in the world. It is 307 miles (494 km) long by 118 miles (190 km) wide with a shoreline 1,640 miles (2,640 km) long.

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