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Dead Sea in Jordan Rift Valley – June 22nd, 2011

31.1N 34.8E

June 22nd, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Middle East - June 20th, 2011

This wide-swath ASAR image focuses the Dead Sea, a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east and Israel/Palestine and the West Bank to the west.

It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River. The valley and river appear a lighter shade of grey.

The Dead Sea is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long and 18 kilometres (11 mi) wide at its widest point. Its surface and shores are 423 metres (1,388 ft) below sea level, the lowest elevation on the Earth’s surface on dry land.

 

Volcanic Fields, the Dead Sea, and Agricultural Areas in the Middle East – July 14th, 2010

31.4N 35.4E

July 14th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Volcanoes

Middle East - June 30th, 2010

Middle East - June 30th, 2010

The right half of this image stretches from southern Syria at the upper right, through Jordan (center) to Saudi Arabia (below). In the left half, following the Mediterranean Coast from north to south, are southern Lebanon, Israel/Palestine, and Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula. Part of the Red Sea can also be seen at the bottom.

Other areas of interest include an agricultural zone in Saudi Arabia, near the border with Jordan (best observed in the full image, in which the shapes of the individual fields can be seen); the Jabal ad-Duruz volcanic plateau, a dark brown patch in Syria adjacent to the I Es Safa hills (northeast of the volcanic field); and the Dead Sea, a salt lake bordering Jordan to the east, and Israel and the West Bank to the west.

Dead Sea – October 29th, 2008

October 29th, 2008 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

The Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea - May 19th, 2008

The Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea - May 19th, 2008

Several different bodies of water are visible in this image of Israel/Palestine, Jordan and part of Syria: the Sea of Galilee to the North, the Dead Sea to the South, the Jordan River, and the Mediterranean Sea to the West.

The Dead Sea is a salt lake between Israel and the West Bank to the west, and Jordan to the east. It is connected to the Sea of Galilee by the Jordan River, The Dead Sea is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long and 18 kilometres (11 mi) wide at its widest point.

It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River. It is 420 metres (1,378 ft) below sea level, and its shores are the lowest point on the surface of the Earth on dry land. The Dead Sea is 330 m (1,083 ft) deep; the deepest hypersaline lake in the world.

The Dead Sea is also the world’s second saltiest body of water, after Lake Asal in Djibouti, with 30 percent salinity. It is 8.6 times saltier than the ocean, and nine times saltier than the Mediterranean Sea.

This salinity makes for a harsh environment where animals cannot flourish. The sea is called “dead” because its high salinity prevents macroscopic aquatic organisms, such as fishes and aquatic plants, from living in it, though minuscule quantities of bacteria and microbial fungi are present.

Close-up of Dead Sea Dikes

Close-up of Dead Sea Dikes

In the image we can observe the recession the Dead Sea has experienced over the last few decades; it has been rapidly shrinking because of diversion of incoming water. From an elevation of 395 m (1,296 ft) below sea level in 1970 it fell 22 m (72 ft) to 418 m (1,371 ft) below sea level in 2006, reaching a drop rate of 1 m (3 ft) per year.

The sea used to be one large body of water, but it is now separated into northern and southern sections. The southern end is fed by a canal maintained by the Dead Sea Works, a company that converts the sea’s raw materials. This company and another, Arab Potash (APC) use extensive salt evaporation pans that have essentially diked the entire southern end of the Dead Sea for the purpose of producing carnallite, potassium magnesium chloride, which is then processed further to produce potassium chloride.

These huge dikes are visible in the satellite image as lines in the southern part of the sea. Unfortunately, the activities of both of these companies contribute to the recession of the water.

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Suez Canal and Great Bitter Lake, Egypt – July 17th, 2011

30.7N 32.3E

July 17th, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes

Egypt - July 12th, 2011

Visible on the right side of this image is the Dead Sea, while near the left edge is part of the fertile, green delta of the Nile River, in Egypt. At the edge of the delta, bordering the Sinai Peninsula, is the Suez Canal, an artificial sea-level waterway in Egypt, connecting the Mediterranean Sea and the Red Sea.

After multiple enlargements, the canal was 193.30 km long, 24 m deep, and 205 m wide as of 2010. It consists of the northern access channel of 22 km, the canal itself of 162.25 km and of the southern access channel of 9 km. It is single-lane with passing places in Ballah By-Pass and in the Great Bitter Lake (visible along the path of the canal in the full image). It contains no locks; seawater flows freely through the canal.

Nile River Valley and Delta, Egypt – July 3rd, 2011

30.0N 31.2E

July 3rd, 2011 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

Egypt - June 21st, 2011

The Nile River Valley appears as a thick, fertile green band on either side of the Nile River as it flows northward towards the triangular Nile Delta, in Egypt.

In the full image, cities and towns across the delta region appear as tan circles, with Cairo visible as a larger grey patch at the stem of the delta.

To the east, across the Sinai Peninsula, the Dead Sea can be seen as well. In the full image, the upper half appears mostly blue in color, while the bottom half is divided by dikes that give it a green, striated pattern.

 

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