Earth Snapshot RSS Feed Twitter
 
 
 
 

Ship Tracks Off Coast of California and Effects on Climate

34.0N 124W

June 7th, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Clouds MODISTerra

USA – June 6th, 2013

The track of large ships is sometimes visualised by a trail of shallow stratus clouds. These clouds, known as ‘ship tracks’, form in the wake of ships and are remarkably long-lived.¬†They typically are between 0.5-5 km wide, i.e. wide enough to be seen in visible satellite imagery. Here, several can be seen southeast of California, USA.

Sometimes a ship track appears as a band of enhanced cloud thickness embedded in stratus. Ship tracks are due to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the ship’s exhaust. They are most likely in a near-saturated environment that is otherwise depleted of CCN. Such environment is very common in the marine boundary layer over the subtropical highs. Over these large, quasi-stationary highs, the boundary-layer air is divergent, making it unlikely to draw in CCN-rich continental air.

The nature and climatic effect of ship tracks has been investigated off the central California coast. Ship tracks increase the albedo, yet have very little effect on the long-wave radiation balance, because they are so shallow. Therefore ship-tracks tend to cool the global climate, although the magnitude of this effect is likely to be small (click here for more information).

Leave a Reply


About Us

Earth Observation

Organisations

Archive

December 2016
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Categories


Bulletin Board


Featured Posts

Information

48


Take Action

Widgets