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Steam and Ash from Popocatépetl Volcano Near Mexico City, Mexico – March 7th, 2013

March 7th, 2013 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Mexico – March 7th, 2013

A thick white pillar of steam and ash from Mexico’s Popocatépetl volcano fans out as it blows east-northeastward. The volcano has been showing signs of activity since February 2013, and according to reports is now entering a new phase of increased activity. Accompanied by strong tremor, a continuous ash and steam emission column is rising to 23,000 ft (7 km) altitude and drifting in the wind.

Popocatépetl is an active volcano located in the states of Puebla, State of Mexico, and Morelos, in Central Mexico, and lies in the eastern half of the Trans-Mexican volcanic belt. At 5,426 m (17,802 ft) it is the second highest peak in Mexico, after the Pico de Orizaba at 5,636 m (18,491 ft).
It is linked to the Iztaccihuatl volcano to the north by the high saddle known as the Paso de Cortés.

Popocatepetl is 70 km (43 mi) southeast of Mexico City, from where it can be seen regularly, depending on atmospheric conditions. Until recently, the volcano was one of three tall peaks in Mexico to contain glaciers, the others being Iztaccihuatl and Pico de Orizaba. In the 1990s, the glaciers such as Glaciar Norte (North Glacier) greatly decreased in size, partly due to warmer temperatures but largely due to increased volcanic activity.

Volcanoes and Lakes of New Zealand’s North Island

38.7S 175.9E

March 7th, 2013 Category: Lakes, Volcanoes

New Zealand – March 6th, 2013

Visible in the center of this image is Lake Taupo, a lake situated in the North Island of New Zealand. Lake Taupo lies in a caldera created by a supervolcanic eruption which occurred approximately 26,500 years ago. With a surface area of 616 square kilometres (238 sq mi), it is the largest lake by surface area in New Zealand.

Two stratovolcanoes can also be observed: Mount Ruapehu, 40 kilometers southwest of Lake Taupo, and Mount Taranaki, on a peninsula in the lower left quadrant. Mount Ruapehu is one of the world’s most active volcanoes and the largest active volcano in New Zealand, as well as the highest point in the North Island. Mount Taranaki, or Mount Egmont, is an active but quiescent stratovolcano.

Snow-Covered Bolshya Ipelka Volcano, Russia – March 1st, 2013

52.5N 157.3E

March 1st, 2013 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Russia – February 28th, 2013

Kamchatka Peninsula, in the Russian Far East, is blanketed in snow. Visible through the white covering are the peaks of volcanoes such as the Bolshya Ipelka (above image center, near west coast), a large volcanic caldera surrounded by a ring-shaped ridge with steep inner walls and rocky outer slopes. It is made up of the remains of a great volcano that has been eroded and destroyed.

Volcanic Eruption in Chile – January 21st, 2013

40.6S 72.5W

January 21st, 2013 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Chile – January 20th, 2013

A cloud of what appears to be ash from a volcanic eruption blows westward over Chile, towards the Pacific Ocean. The ash appears to be emanating from one of the four different volcanoes that constitute the volcanic group known as the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex: the Cordillera Nevada caldera, the Pliocene Mencheca volcano, Cordón Caulle fissure vents and the Puyehue stratovolcano. However, reports of volcanic activity in Chile indicate that activity is currently limited to the Copahue and Villarrica volcanoes, meaning that the cloud in this image may be the result of other phenomena, such as wildfires.

Continued Eruption of Plosky Tolbachik Volcano, Russia

55.8N 160.3E

December 25th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Russia – December 17th, 2012

A plume of ash blows from the Plosky Tolbachik Volcano, on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula, over the Kamchatka Strait. The volcano has been erupting for nearly a month. The volcano, which is visible left of the image center, is flanked by the Tolbachinsky Dol, a large, mostly treeless lava plateau that descends gradually for 25 km (15.5 mi). The plateau has been heavily affected by both ash fall and lava flow from the volcano from the early Holocene to recent times, giving it the darker brown color that can be seen here where the snow has melted.

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