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Lake Taupo and Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand – December 12th, 2010

38.7S 175.8E

December 12th, 2010 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Volcanoes

New Zealand - December 9th, 2010

The large, dark blue lake in the center of New Zealand’s North Island is Lake Taupo. It is actually the water-filled caldera of a large rhyolitic volcano.

South of the Lake Taupo is Mount Ruapehu, an active stratovolcano at the southern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Here, its peak, the highest point on the North Island, appears capped with snow.

Volcanoes Near Lake Taupo, New Zealand

38.7S 175.8E

November 27th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers, Volcanoes

New Zealand - November 13th, 2009

New Zealand - November 13th, 2009

Several volcanoes are visible near Lake Taupo, the large lake at the upper right, in this orthorectified image of New Zealand’s North Island. Following the Tongariro River, one of the lake’s main tributaries, upstream from the lower end of the lake, one comes to a smaller lake known as Lake Rotoaira.

Between these two lakes is Mount Pihanga, a 1325m volcanic peak on the North Island Volcanic Plateau. Another smaller body of water, Lake Rotopounamu, is at the north-west foot of the mountain. Mt. Pihanga and Lake Rotopounamu are part of the 5,129ha Pihanga Scenic Reserve, which in 1975 was added to the Tongariro National Park.

South of Mount Pihanga is Mount Tongariro, a volcanic complex located 20 kilometres to the southwest of Lake Taupo. It is the northernmost of the three active volcanoes that dominate the landscape of the central North Island. This volcanic massif, often simply referred to as Tongariro, has a height of 1,978 metres.

The volcano consists of at least 12 cones; Ngauruhoe, while often regarded as a separate mountain, is geologically a vent of Tongariro. It is also the most active, having erupted more than 70 times since 1839.

Continuing south of Ngauruhoe is Mount Ruapehu, an active stratovolcano at the southern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone. It is 23 kilometres northeast of Ohakune and 40 kilometres southwest of the southern shore of Lake Taupo, within Tongariro National Park.  Ruapehu is one of the world’s most active volcanoes and the largest active volcano in New Zealand. It is the highest point in the North Island and includes three major peaks: Tahurangi (2,797 m), Te Heuheu (2,755 m) and Paretetaitonga (2,751 m).

Lakes Rotorua and Taupo, New Zealand

38.1S 176.2E

September 14th, 2009 Category: Lakes, Volcanoes

New Zealand - August 16th, 2009

New Zealand - August 16th, 2009

Several lakes can be seen in this orthorectified image of New Zealand’s North Island. Easily distinguished by its bright grey appearance here is Lake Taupo, the country’s largest lake by surface area. The city of Taupo can be seen on its northeastern shores. A large agricultural area extends east-northeast of the lake, above the Kaweka Range.

In the upper right quadrant of the image is an area with several lakes, all of which appear dark grey here. Lake Rotorua is the second largest lake in the North Island of New Zealand by surface area, and covers 79.8km2. With a mean depth of only 10 metres it is considerably smaller than nearby Lake Tarawera in terms of volume of water.

The city of Rotorua is situated on its southern shore. In the middle of the lake is Mokoia Island, a rhyolite lava dome with an area of 1.35 square kilometres, rising to 180 metres above the lake surface.

The lake was formed from the crater of a large volcano in the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Its last major eruption was about 240,000 years ago. After the eruption, the magma chamber underneath the volcano collapsed. The circular depression left behind is the Rotorua Caldera, which is the site of the lake. Several other lakes of volcanic origin are located nearby to the east, around the base of the active volcano Mount Tarawera.

Lake Taupo and the Kaweka Range, New Zealand

38.7S 175.8E

August 2nd, 2009 Category: Lakes

New Zealand - July 12th, 2009

New Zealand - July 12th, 2009

Lake Taupo, left, is a lake situated in the North Island of New Zealand. It has a perimeter of approximately 193 kilometres, a deepest point of 186 metres and a surface area of 616 square kilometres.

The largest lake by surface area in the country, it is drained by the Waikato River, while its main tributaries are the Waitahanui River, the Tongariro River, and the Tauranga-Taupo River.

In this orthorectified image, the Kaweka Range is visible to the south and east of the lake, as is a large agricultural area between the two.

Volcanoes and Lakes of New Zealand’s North Island

38.7S 175.9E

March 7th, 2013 Category: Lakes, Volcanoes

New Zealand – March 6th, 2013

Visible in the center of this image is Lake Taupo, a lake situated in the North Island of New Zealand. Lake Taupo lies in a caldera created by a supervolcanic eruption which occurred approximately 26,500 years ago. With a surface area of 616 square kilometres (238 sq mi), it is the largest lake by surface area in New Zealand.

Two stratovolcanoes can also be observed: Mount Ruapehu, 40 kilometers southwest of Lake Taupo, and Mount Taranaki, on a peninsula in the lower left quadrant. Mount Ruapehu is one of the world’s most active volcanoes and the largest active volcano in New Zealand, as well as the highest point in the North Island. Mount Taranaki, or Mount Egmont, is an active but quiescent stratovolcano.