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Houston and Galveston Bay in Texas, USA – January 15th, 2012

29.3N 94.6W

January 15th, 2012 Category: Image of the day

USA and Canada - December 26th, 2011

This orthorectified image shows the city of Houston, Texas, by Galveston Bay. The bay is a large estuary located along the upper coast of Texas in the United States. It is connected to the Gulf of Mexico and is surrounded by sub-tropic marshes and prairies on the mainland. The water in the Bay is a complex mixture of sea water and fresh water which supports a wide variety of marine life.

The Galveston Bay system actually consists of four main subbays: Galveston Bay proper (upper and lower), Trinity Bay, East Bay, and West Bay. The Bay is fed by the Trinity River and the San Jacinto River, numerous local bayous and incoming tides from the Gulf of Mexico. Many smaller bays and lakes are connected to the main system such as Christmas Bay, Moses Lake, Dickinson Bay, Clear Lake, Ash Lake, Black Duck Bay, and San Jacinto Bay. The Bay covers approximately 600 square miles (1,500 km²), and is 30 miles (50 km) long and 17 miles (27 km) wide. Galveston Bay is on average 7–9 feet (3 m) deep.

Fire Near Houston and Galveston Bay, USA – December 5th, 2011

29.7N 95.3W

December 5th, 2011 Category: Image of the day

USA - November 17th, 2011

The city of Houston appears as a large, tan expanse near the Gulf of Mexico in this image of Texas, USA. It is the fourth-largest city in the United States, and the largest city in the state of Texas.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 601.7 square miles (1,558 km2); this comprises 579.4 square miles (1,501 km2) of land and 22.3 square miles (58 km2) of water. Most of Houston is located on the gulf coastal plain, and its vegetation is classified as temperate grassland and forest. Much of the city was built on forested land, marshes, swamp, or prairie, which are all still visible in surrounding areas.

Visible southeast of the city is Galveston Bay, a large estuary  connected to the Gulf of Mexico and surrounded by sub-tropic marshes and prairies on the mainland.  The water in the Bay is a complex mixture of sea water and fresh water which supports a wide variety of marine life. Here, sediments in the bay give it a tan and green color.

Visible northeast of the bay, and east of Houston, in the upper right corner, is a wildfire releasing a plume of grey smoke towards the southwest.

Houston and Various Bays Along the Texas Coast, USA

28.5N 96.3W

January 8th, 2011 Category: Sediments

USA - December 26th, 2010

Various bays, green and tan due to sediments, can be observed along the Gulf of Mexico coast of Texas, USA. The city of Houston appears as a greyish area in the upper right quadrant.

Near Houston is Trinity Bay, the northeast portion of Galveston Bay, bordered by Chambers and Harris counties in Texas, United States. The bay, approximately 20 mi long, heads at the mouth of the Trinity River. Trinity Bay is separated from the main part of Galveston Bay by the San Jacinto River, part of the Houston Ship Channel.

Of the bays further southwest along the coast, the largest is Matagorda Bay, lying in Calhoun and Matagorda counties. It is separated from the Gulf of Mexico by Matagorda Peninsula and serves as the mouth of numerous streams, most notably the Lavaca and Colorado Rivers.

Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico Near Houston, Texas – November 17th, 2009

29.7N 95.3W

November 17th, 2009 Category: Image of the day, Lakes, Rivers

USA - November 10th, 2009

USA - November 10th, 2009

Louisiana Lakes and Bays

Louisiana Lakes and Bays

Houston, Texas

Houston, Texas

The waters in the Gulf of Mexico off the coasts of Texas (to the west) and Louisiana (to the east), USA, are laden with sediments. Those in bays and released from rivers by the Louisiana shores are a thick, muddy brown, while those flanking the Texas shoreline are diluted to a greener hue.

The first close-up focuses on the city of Houston, the largest city within the state of Texas. The city, most of which is situated on the gulf coastal plain, is connected to a large bay to the southeast. This bay is divided into three sections: Trinity Bay (north), East Bay (east) and Galveston Bay (south). Here, the bay is mostly colored light brown from sediments, which can then be sen spilling out into the Gulf.

The second close-up depicts a series of lakes and bays  filled with dark brown sediments along the Louisiana coastline. These are, from left to right, Sabine Lake, Calcasieu Lake, Grand Lake, White Lake, Vermilion  Bay and West Cote Blanche Bay.

The City and Lake of Houston, USA

29.7N 95.3W

August 22nd, 2009 Category: Lakes, Rivers

USA - July 3rd, 2009

USA - July 3rd, 2009

Houston is the fourth-largest city in the United States and the largest city within the state of Texas. As of the 2008, the estimated population of the city was 2.3 million within an area of 600 square miles (1,600 km²).

Fifteen miles (24 km) northeast of the city center is Lake Houston, a reservoir on the west fork of the San Jacinto River. It serves as the primary municipal water supply for the city of Houston and much of the surrounding area.