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Isthmus of Tehuantepec Between Gulf of Mexico and Pacific Ocean, Mexico

17.5N 94.5W

March 26th, 2013 Category: Snapshots

Mexico – March 23rd, 2013

The Isthmus of Tehuantepec is an isthmus in Mexico. It represents the shortest distance between the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific Ocean. At its narrowest point, the isthmus is 200 km (120 mi) across from gulf to gulf, or 192 km (119 mi) to the head of Laguna Superior on the Pacific coast. The northern side of the isthmus is swampy and densely covered with jungle.

The Sierra Madre breaks down at this point into a broad, plateau-like ridge. Since Sierra Madre de Oaxaca mountains flatten out to form Chivela Pass before the Sierra Madre de Chiapas mountains resume to the south, geographically the isthmus divides North America from Central America.

Florida Everglades and Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea – December 25th, 2012

24.3N 86.2W

December 25th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Sediments

USA, Mexico and Cuba – December 22nd, 2012

Sediments can be seen along the southwestern coast of Florida, USA (upper right), in the Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba (center right), along the western and northern coasts of the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico (lower left) and by the Mississippi River Delta in Louisiana, USA (upper left). In the former three, the bright, light color is in part due to sediments and in part due to shallower depths.

Of particular note in Florida are the Everglades. Beginning in 1948 with the creation of the Central and Southern Florida (C&SF) Flood Control Project, much of the original greater Everglades ecosystem was drained in an effort to create a system of canals and dikes that would control the flow of water and accommodate agriculture and urban development. Some 50 percent of the original Everglades has been lost to agriculture and development but the majority of the remaining original Everglades acreage is now protected in a national park, national wildlife refuge, and water conservation areas.

Louisiana, USA Shoreline Along Gulf of Mexico

29.9N 90W

December 12th, 2012 Category: Clouds

USA – December 12th, 2012

Although clouds hang over the southern part of the state of Louisiana and the northern part of the Gulf of Mexico, the use of the Chelys Satellite Rapid Response System (SRRS) “borders” feature lets users see the Louisiana shoreline, including the Mississippi River Delta. The feature allows users to download images with countries’ outlines superimposed over cloudcover.

Mississippi River Flowing Through Southern USA to Gulf of Mexico

32.4N 91.6W

November 28th, 2012 Category: Rivers

USA – November 25th, 2012

The Mississippi River is the chief river of the largest river system in North America. It rises in northern Minnesota and meanders slowly southwards for 2,530 miles (4,070 km) to the Mississippi River Delta at the Gulf of Mexico (bottom). The river either borders or cuts through ten states. Here, it can be seen in Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana. Formed from thick layers of this river’s silt deposits, the Mississippi River Valley is one of the most fertile agricultural regions of the country,

Fires in Southern USA by Gulf of Mexico Coast

29.7N 95.3W

October 29th, 2012 Category: Fires, Sediments

USA – October 28th, 2012

Fires near the coast of southern USA, by the Texas-Louisiana border, release plumes of smoke that blow south, over the Gulf of Mexico. Visible to the left of the two west-most smoke plumes is the city of Houston. On the right side of the image, New Orleans and the sediment-laden mouth of the Mississippi River can be observed.