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Search Results for "dust storm china march 2013":

Intense Dust Storm Over China – March 9th, 2013

March 9th, 2013 Category: Dust Storms

China – March 9th, 2013

Thick dust blows over China, from the Mongolian border to China’s northeastern plains, where it meets a grey haze. Dust storms are among the region’s leading natural hazards. Much of the dust visible here may originate in the Badain Jaran and Tengger Deserts, two large interconnected deserts whose tall sand dunes are covered by the airborn particles.

China Dust Spreads to Japan – March 19th, 2013

38.8N 119.7E

March 19th, 2013 Category: Dust Storms, Image of the day

China – March 9th, 2013

Beijing’s air quality deteriorated again as a sandstorm and thick smog added to the problem. The smog and dust also reached across the Bohai Gulf to the Korean Peninsula and then to Japan. Tokyo was blanketed with dust that darkened the skies, rapidly decreasing visibility as dry dust particles whirled through the air.

Meteorologists said the phenomenon was caused by a sudden cold front, and was not linked with the suffocating pollution that hung over the Chinese capital Beijing last winter. Japan and other regional countries, however, have voiced concern about the impact of airborne pollution drifting from their influential neighbor.

The toxic haze that periodically blankets parts of China has been blamed on emissions from coal burning in power stations but also on fumes from vehicles on the traffic-clogged streets of the world’s largest largest auto market.

Haze Over Yangtze River Mouth, China

31.2N 121.4E

March 18th, 2013 Category: Clouds, Sediments

China – March 10th, 2013

Haze that is likely a combination of smog and dust from a dust storm spreading across China hovers over the mouth of the Yangtze River and blows eastward, south of the Korean Peninsula, towards Japan. Partially visible through the haze are sediments from the Yangtze. Sediments and phytoplankton growth also color the waters of the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea.

Dust Storm on Eastern Edge of Taklamakan Desert, China

39.5N 90.0E

March 18th, 2013 Category: Climate Change, Dust Storms

China – March 11th, 2013

A duststorm affects the Taklamakan Desert in western China, particularly by its eastern edge. The Taklamakan is China’s biggest desert and is an immense sea of shifting sand dunes, which dominates the west of the country.

The fringes of the desert are most susceptible to desertification, as overgrazing on farmland bordering the desert tends to strip the lands of their grass and hence allows the desert to take hold and expand. During the spring, winds tend to increase in intensity in the west of China. As the spring winds blow, they pick up the sand and dust lying on top of the degraded land and carry it into the air, creating these massive dust and sand storms.

Dust Storm Over Tarim Basin, China

39.1N 82.9E

March 15th, 2013 Category: Dust Storms

China – March 11th, 2013

Winds blowing about the Tarim Basin kick up a large quantity of dust particles that obscure the entirety of the Taklamakan Desert, in northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. The tall mountains surrounding the desert – the Tian Shan to the north, the Kunlun Mountains to the south, and the Pamir Mountains to the west, keep much of the dust from blowing beyond the basin. However, much escapes via the eastern side, through the Gobi Desert, and can blow eastward across the country.