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Coastal and Marine Ecosystem of Sabana-Camagüey Archipelago, Cuba

21.9N 77.8W

April 22nd, 2013 Category: Fires

Cuba – April 21st, 2013

Highlighted by sunglint in  the upper left quadrant of this image is the Sabana-Camagüey Archipelago, a group of islands that lines Cuba’s north-central Atlantic coast. Visible on the main island are several fires, marked by red and orange indicators.

The archipelago is developed on a general north-east to south-west direction, and stretches for 475 km (295 mi) from the Hicacos Peninsula and Varadero to the Bay of Nuevitas.

The entire system covers more than 75,000 km2 (29,000 sq mi) and is composed of approximately 2,517 cays and isles. The western islands are grouped in the Jardines del Rey archipelago, and contains Cayo Coco, Cayo Guillermo and Cayo Romano among others.

The coastal and marine ecosystem represented by the archipelago is undergoing conservation projects to protect the mangroves and coastal forests, which effectively create a buffer zone between the agricultural coast and the sensitive marine environment.

Brilliant Colors of Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba – February 10th, 2013

21.9N 82.7W

February 10th, 2013 Category: Image of the day

Cuba – January 25th, 2013

The Gulf of Batabanó is an inlet or strait off southwestern Cuba in the Caribbean Sea, separating mainland Cuba from the Isle of Youth. It is easily recognizable here by its bright, turquoise blue color. The northeastern section of the bay, called the Ensenada de la Broa, on the other hand, appears darker green, probably due to an influx of sediments and algal growth. The gulf’s bright blue waters are in part due to their shallow depth: less than 200 feet (61 m).

Gulf of Batabanó and Guanahacabibes Peninsula, Cuba

22.4N 83.7W

January 28th, 2012 Category: Sediments

Cuba - December 18th, 2012

The Gulf of Batabanó, off southwestern Cuba, appears bright blue and green due to its shallow waters, sediments and algal growth. The waters of the northeastern extension of the gulf, called Ensenada de la Broa, are a darker green color.

The Gulf of Batabanó is an inlet or strait in the Caribbean Sea, separating mainland Cuba (above) from the Isle of Youth (below). The gulf is shallow–less than 200 feet (61 m) deep–and contains about 350 smaller islands of the Canarreos Archipelago (Archipiélago de los Canarreos) besides the Isle of Youth.

Visible at the left edge of the image is the Guanahacabibes Peninsula, the westernmost point on the island of Cuba. It is located in Pinar del Río Province, in the municipality of Sandino and is sparsely populated. It also boasts the category of Biosphere Reserve, listed by UNESCO in 1987. Its location in the open waters of the Gulf of Mexico makes it vulnerable to hurricanes.

Sediments in Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba

22.5N 82.4W

November 30th, 2011 Category: Sediments

Cuba - November 21st, 2011

The Gulf of Batabanó is an inlet or strait off southwestern Cuba in the Caribbean Sea, separating mainland Cuba (above) from the Isle of Youth (below). The gulf is shallow–less than 200 feet (61 m) deep–and contains about 350 smaller islands of the Canarreos Archipelago (Archipiélago de los Canarreos) besides the Isle of Youth. Here, this shallower depth combined with the presence of sediments in the waters give the gulf a lighter blue color than the nearby sea.

The gulf’s northern border begins at the southern coast of Cuba in Pinar del Río Province, Havana Province, and Matanzas Province, ending at the Zapata Peninsula (Península de Zapata), a length of about 80 miles (130 km). The northeastern section of the gulf is also called Ensenada de la Broa. The gulf stretches south about 50 miles (80 km) to the Isle of Youth.

Vegetation Index of Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, and Neighboring Islands

18.1N 77.3W

November 15th, 2011 Category: Vegetation Index

Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica and Neighboring Islands- November 14th, 2011

This FAPAR image shows the vegetation index of central to eastern Cuba (left), Jamaica (lower center), Haiti (lower right), the Bahamas (upper left) and the Turks and Caicos islands (center right).

The vegetation index generally ranges from good (green) to high (rusty red) throughout the image, with a few small areas of low activity (yellow), mainly in the Bahamas. The index appears higher in Cuba and Jamaica than in Haiti.

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