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Puyehue Volcano Eruption Continues

40.6S 72.5W

July 27th, 2011 Category: Volcanoes

Chile and Argentina - July 23rd, 2011

Ash East of Rio de la Plata Estuary - July 23rd, 2011

After a quieter spell, Chile’s Puyehue Volcano released a large cloud of ash once again in late July (click link for more on the 2011 Puyehue volcanic eruption). The eruption began on June 4th.

While the main image focuses on the volcano itself, the detail image shows the ash cloud spreading east of the Rio de la Plata estuary. A change in wind direction caused the ash to blow over the estuary itself, causing flight cancellations from Buenos Aires and Montevideo.

Eruption from Puyehue Volcano, Chile – June 12th, 2011

40.5S 72.1W

June 12th, 2011 Category: Volcanoes

Chile and Argentina - June 5th, 2011

This image shows ash blasting forth from the Puyehue Volcano in Chile. Here, the ash plume is blowing towards the southeast. Recent activity at the volcano has resulted in alert level 4 (out of 4) being issued on 03 June 2011.

A new eruption started as of 03 June, 20:30 UTC. As of 04 June, the ash cloud reached a height of 10,000 metres (32,810 ft). Click on the following link for previous articles on the 2011 Puyehue eruption.

Puyehue and Cordón Caulle are two coalesced volcanic vents that form a major mountain massif in Puyehue National Park in the Andes of Ranco Province, Chile. In volcanology this group is known as the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex (PCCVC).

Four different volcanoes constitute the volcanic group or complex, the Cordillera Nevada caldera, the Pliocene Mencheca volcano, Cordón Caulle fissure vents and the Puyehue stratovolcano.

As with most stratovolcanoes on the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes, Puyehue and Cordón Caulle are located along the intersection of a traverse fault with the larger north-south Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault.

The volcanic complex has shaped the local landscape and produced a huge variety of volcanic landforms and products over the last 300,000 years. Cinder cones, lava domes, calderas and craters can be found in the area apart from the widest variety of volcanic rocks in all the Southern Volcanic Zone,for example both primitive basalts and rhyolites. Cordón Caulle is notable for having erupted following the 1960 Valdivia earthquake, the largest recorded earthquake in history.

 

 

Volcanic Eruption in Chile – January 21st, 2013

40.6S 72.5W

January 21st, 2013 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Chile – January 20th, 2013

A cloud of what appears to be ash from a volcanic eruption blows westward over Chile, towards the Pacific Ocean. The ash appears to be emanating from one of the four different volcanoes that constitute the volcanic group known as the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex: the Cordillera Nevada caldera, the Pliocene Mencheca volcano, Cordón Caulle fissure vents and the Puyehue stratovolcano. However, reports of volcanic activity in Chile indicate that activity is currently limited to the Copahue and Villarrica volcanoes, meaning that the cloud in this image may be the result of other phenomena, such as wildfires.

Ash and Steam Released from Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcano

40.5S 72.1W

March 16th, 2012 Category: Volcanoes

Chile and Argentina - March 7th, 2012

Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano could be seen releasing ash and steam at the end of the first week of March, 2012. The Chilean National Service of Geology and Mining reported that the plume was 1.2 kilometers (3,900 feet) high, and extended 30 kilometers (19 miles) from the active vent.

Other effects of the eruption can also be observed. Immediately to the east of the volcanic complex is a dark brown area, thick with fallen ash fall that has killed much of the vegetation. Further east are several bright turquoise lakes whose milky color is caused by fine ash suspended in the water. Some lakes show evidence of floating ash and pumice.

Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcano Active Again – February 10th, 2012

40.6S 72.5W

February 10th, 2012 Category: Image of the day, Volcanoes

Chile and Argentina - February 6th, 2012

Chile’s Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcano releases ash and steam once again in early February. Here, the ash plume can be seen blowing to the east-northeast, over Argentina. Misleadingly called by media the Puyehue eruption, the eruption is actually from the Cordon Caulle fissure.

The eruption began over eight months ago, in the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic complex, on June 4, 2011, although increased seismic activity had been reported even earlier, on April 27, 2011. The ash cloud from the first period of eruptions was blown across cities all around the Southern hemisphere, including Bariloche, Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Stanley, Porto Alegre, Cape Town, Hobart, Perth, Adelaide, Sydney, Melbourne, Wellington and Auckland, forcing airlines to cancel hundreds of international and domestic flights and causing travel chaos.

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